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The IMF's Role in Mobilizing Private Capital Flows: Are There Grounds for Catalytic Conversion?

Author

Listed:
  • Graham Bird

    (University of Surrey)

  • Dane Rowlands

    (Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University)

Abstract

Recent theoretical and empirical research suggests that under certain conditions IMF agreements induce additional inflows of finance from other private sources. This paper provides new empirical evidence on this catalytic effect using a treatment effects model to correct for selectivity. It concludes that catalysis remains weak or negative overall, with nuances that support recent theory.

Suggested Citation

  • Graham Bird & Dane Rowlands, 2007. "The IMF's Role in Mobilizing Private Capital Flows: Are There Grounds for Catalytic Conversion?," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0207, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  • Handle: RePEc:sur:surrec:0207
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    File URL: https://repec.som.surrey.ac.uk/2007/DP02-07.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Curzio Giannini & Carlo Cottarelli, 2002. "Bedfellows, Hostages, or Perfect Strangers? Global Capital Markets and the Catalytic Effect of IMF Crisis Lending," IMF Working Papers 02/193, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jorra, Markus, 2012. "The effect of IMF lending on the probability of sovereign debt crises," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 709-725.
    2. Koen J. M. van der Veer & Eelke de Jong, 2013. "IMF-Supported Programmes: Stimulating Capital to Non-defaulting Countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(4), pages 375-395, April.
    3. Molly Bauer & Cesi Cruz & Benjamin Graham, 2012. "Democracies only: When do IMF agreements serve as a seal of approval?," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 33-58, March.
    4. Schmaljohann, Maya, 2013. "Enhancing Foreign Direct Investment via Transparency? Evaluating the Effects of the EITI on FDI," Working Papers 538, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    5. De Haas, Ralph & Korniyenko, Yevgeniya & Pivovarsky, Alexander & Tsankova, Teodora, 2015. "Taming the herd? Foreign banks, the Vienna Initiative and crisis transmission," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 325-355.
    6. Schmaljohann, Maya, 2013. "Enhancing Foreign Direct Investment via Transparency? Evaluating the Effects of the EITI on FDI," Working Papers 0538, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    IMF; catalysis; international capital flows;

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

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