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Uncertainty Averse Bank Runners

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  • Guido Cozzi
  • Paolo Giordani

Abstract

In the framework of a Diamond-Dybvig-Peck-Shell banking model, in which a broad class of feasible contractual arrangements is allowed and which admits a run equilibrium, we stress the assumption that depositors are uncertain of their position in the queue when expecting a run. The formalization of the depositor's attitude towards this form of uncertainty is inspired by the multiple prior maxmin expected utility (MEU) theory axiomatized by Gilboa and Schmeidler (1989). We prove that there exists a positive measure set of subjective prior beliefs, obtained from the minimization over the set of admissible priors, for which the bank run equilibrium disappears. The implication is that `suspension schemes' are valuable since, in addition to the improvement in risk-sharing among agents (Wallace (1990)), they may undermine panic-driven bank runs.

Suggested Citation

  • Guido Cozzi & Paolo Giordani, 2004. "Uncertainty Averse Bank Runners," Working Papers 71, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sap:wpaper:wp71
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    2. Daniel Ellsberg, 2000. "Risk, Ambiguity and the Savage Axioms," Levine's Working Paper Archive 7605, David K. Levine.
    3. James Peck & Karl Shell, 2003. "Equilibrium Bank Runs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(1), pages 103-123, February.
    4. Gilboa, Itzhak & Schmeidler, David, 1989. "Maxmin expected utility with non-unique prior," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 141-153, April.
    5. Edward J. Green & Ping Lin, 2000. "Diamond and Dybvig's classic theory of financial intermediation : what's missing?," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 3-13.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Uncertainty; Multi-Prior Beliefs; Suspension Schemes; Panic-Driven Bank Runs.;

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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