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Should Central Banks of Small Open Economies Respond to Exchange Rate Fluctuations? The Case of South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Sami Alpanda
  • Kevin Kotze
  • Geoffrey Woglom

Abstract

We estimate a New Keynesian small open economy DSGE model for South Africa, using Bayesian techniques. The model features imperfect competition, incomplete asset markets, partial exchange rate pass-through, and other commonly used nominal and real rigidities, such as sticky prices, price indexation and habit formation. We study the effects of various shocks on macroeconomic variables, and calculate the optimal Taylor rule coefficients using a loss function for the central bank. We find that the optimal Taylor rule places a heavier weight on inflation and output than the estimated Taylor rule, but almost no weight on the depreciation of currency.

Suggested Citation

  • Sami Alpanda & Kevin Kotze & Geoffrey Woglom, 2010. "Should Central Banks of Small Open Economies Respond to Exchange Rate Fluctuations? The Case of South Africa," Working Papers 174, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:174
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    File URL: http://www.econrsa.org/node/197
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    Cited by:

    1. Aron, Janine & Farrell, Greg & Muellbauer, John & Sinclair, Peter, 2010. "Exchange Rate Pass-through and Monetary Policy in South Africa," CEPR Discussion Papers 8153, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Mehmet Balcilar & Rangan Gupta & Kevin Kotze, 2013. "Forecasting South African Macroeconomic Data with a Nonlinear DSGE Model," Working Papers 201313, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Rangan Gupta & Patrick T. Kanda & Mampho P. Modise & Alessia Paccagnini, 2015. "DSGE model-based forecasting of modelled and nonmodelled inflation variables in South Africa," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(3), pages 207-221, January.
    4. Rudi Steinbach & Stan du Plessis & Ben Smit, 2014. "Monetary policy and financial shocks in an empirical small open-economy DSGE model," EcoMod2014 7194, EcoMod.
    5. Francis Leni Anguyo & Rangan Gupta & Kevin Kotze, 2017. "Monetary Policy and Financial Frictions in a Small Open-Economy Model for Uganda," School of Economics Macroeconomic Discussion Paper Series 2017-01, School of Economics, University of Cape Town.
    6. Davide Debortoli & Ricardo Nunes, 2014. "Monetary Regime Switches and Central Bank Preferences," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(8), pages 1591-1626, December.
    7. Paetz, Michael & Gupta, Rangan, 2016. "Stock price dynamics and the business cycle in an estimated DSGE model for South Africa," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 166-182.
    8. Balcilar, Mehmet & Gupta, Rangan & Kotzé, Kevin, 2015. "Forecasting macroeconomic data for an emerging market with a nonlinear DSGE model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 215-228.
    9. Stan du Plessis & Ben Smit & Rudi Steinbach, 2014. "A medium-sized open economy DSGE model of South Africa," Working Papers 6319, South African Reserve Bank.
    10. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-562 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Rangan Gupta & Patrick T. kanda & Mampho P. Modise & Alessia Paccagnini, 2013. "DSGE Model-Based Forecasting of Modeled and Non-Modeled Inflation Variables in South Africa," Working Papers 201374, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    optimal monetary policy; small open economy; Bayesian estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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