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What Difference Does a Country Make? Earnings by Soviets in the Soviet Union and in the United States

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  • Ira N. Gang

    () (Rutgers University)

  • Robert C. Stuart

    () (Rutgers University)

Abstract

This paper utilizes the Soviet Interview Project (SIP) and the 1990 U.S. census to identify and to track a sample of Soviet émigrés. After examining basic descriptive statistics on income mobility, we specify and estimate earnings functions to examine the impact of a variety of explanatory factors on household earnings in the Soviet Union and in the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Ira N. Gang & Robert C. Stuart, 1997. "What Difference Does a Country Make? Earnings by Soviets in the Soviet Union and in the United States," Departmental Working Papers 199606, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:199606
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. George J. Borjas, 1992. "National Origin and the Skills of Immigrants in the Postwar Period," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 17-48 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ira N. Gang & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2000. "Is Child like Parent? Educational Attainment and Ethnic Origin," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(3), pages 550-569.
    3. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    4. Ira N Gang & Robert C Stuart, 1996. "Urban to Urban Migration: Soviet Patterns and Post-Soviet Implications," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 38(1), pages 21-36, April.
    5. Atkinson,Anthony Barnes & Micklewright,John, 1992. "Economic Transformation in Eastern Europe and the Distribution of Income," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521438827, March.
    6. Linz, Susan J, 1995. "Russian Labor Market in Transition," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(4), pages 693-716, July.
    7. Spagat, Michael, 1995. "Human Capital, Instability and Foreign Investment in Transition Economies," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 28(2-3), pages 185-203.
    8. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
    9. Borjas, George J, 1987. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 531-553, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ira N. Gang, 1997. "Schooling, Parents and Country," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 66(1), pages 180-186.
    2. Bauer, Thomas K. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 1999. "Occupational Mobility of Ethnic Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 58, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Dimova, Ralitza & Gang, Ira N., 2007. "Self-selection and wages during volatile transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 612-629, September.
    4. Ira N. Gang & Ralitza Dimova, 2004. "Self-Selection And Earnings During Volatile Transition," Departmental Working Papers 200409, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    5. Ira N. Gang & Robert C. Stuart & Myeong-Su Yun, 2006. "Wage Growth and Inequality Change During Rapid Economic Transition," Departmental Working Papers 200631, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    6. Ira N. Gang, 1996. "Who Matters Most? The Effect of Parent's Schooling on Children's Schooling," Departmental Working Papers 199613, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.

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