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Urban to Urban Migration: Soviet Patterns and Post-Soviet Implications


  • Ira N. Gang

    () (Rutgers University)

  • Robert C. Stuart

    () (Rutgers University)


In spite of extensive literature on migration in the Soviet Union, we know little about household-level decisions. This study specifies and estimates those variables important to understanding the migration decision. Using data from the Soviet Interview Project (SIP), we examine the forces influencing the decision to migrate or not to migrate, and in addition, for those who did migrate, the forces influencing the locational choices made. The results indicate that, while some of the traditional factors influencing migration are important, others are not, suggestion that in the post-Soviet era, differentiating the persistence of Soviet-type forces from emerging market-type forces will be important for an understanding of urban to urban migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Ira N. Gang & Robert C. Stuart, 1996. "Urban to Urban Migration: Soviet Patterns and Post-Soviet Implications," Departmental Working Papers 199605, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:199605

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. George J. Borjas, 1992. "National Origin and the Skills of Immigrants in the Postwar Period," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 17-48 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ira N. Gang & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2000. "Is Child like Parent? Educational Attainment and Ethnic Origin," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(3), pages 550-569.
    3. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    4. Ira N Gang & Robert C Stuart, 1996. "Urban to Urban Migration: Soviet Patterns and Post-Soviet Implications," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 38(1), pages 21-36, April.
    5. Atkinson,Anthony Barnes & Micklewright,John, 1992. "Economic Transformation in Eastern Europe and the Distribution of Income," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521438827, March.
    6. Linz, Susan J, 1995. "Russian Labor Market in Transition," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(4), pages 693-716, July.
    7. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
    8. Borjas, George J, 1987. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 531-553, September.
    9. Spagat, Michael, 1995. "Human Capital, Instability and Foreign Investment in Transition Economies," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 28(2-3), pages 185-203.
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    Cited by:

    1. Beniamin Viorel BRANZAS, 2015. "Public Services Impact on Urban Migration Phenomenon in Romania," REVISTA DE MANAGEMENT COMPARAT INTERNATIONAL/REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL COMPARATIVE MANAGEMENT, Faculty of Management, Academy of Economic Studies, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 16(3), pages 417-430, July.
    2. Ira N. Gang & Robert C. Stuart, 1998. "Mobility Where Mobility is Illegal: Migration and City Growth in the Soviet Union," Departmental Working Papers 199709, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    3. Gang, Ira N & Stuart, Robert C, 2002. "The Political Economy of Russian City Growth," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(3), pages 491-508, April.
    4. Gang, Ira N. & Stuart, Robert C., 1997. "What difference does a country make? Earnings by Soviets in the Soviet Union and in the United States," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(Supplemen), pages 345-360.
    5. Ira N. Gang, 1996. "Who Matters Most? The Effect of Parent's Schooling on Children's Schooling," Departmental Working Papers 199613, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    6. L.A. Grogan, 1997. "Wage Dispersion in Russia," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 97-075/3, Tinbergen Institute.

    More about this item


    household; location; migration; soviet; urban to urban;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population


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