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Regional Economic Resilience and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: The Case of New Orleans' Tourism and Fishing Clusters




The Deepwater Horizon oil spill dumped almost 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over a three month period in 2010. This event had a significant economic impact (which compounded the recession effect) on the surrounding regions particularly those with a large marine industry presence. This paper seeks to address the issues that have arisen over the past year as a result of the oil spill, focusing on the capacity of the regional economy to respond to the exogenous shocks of mass pollution and global recession while highlighting any economic recovery efforts as well as any tensions created. To represent both the region and the industry, the coastal tourism and fishing clusters in Southern Louisiana will be used as case studies. Through the analysis of socioeconomic data and secondary source material, including historic economic recovery accounts in the region post-Hurricane Katrina, these issues will be assessed. Recommendations will be made regarding the recovery process which will take into account US government policy

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  • Porter, Julie, 2011. "Regional Economic Resilience and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: The Case of New Orleans' Tourism and Fishing Clusters," Spatial and Organizational Dynamics Discussion Papers 2011-12, CIEO-Research Centre for Spatial and Organizational Dynamics, University of Algarve.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:cieodp:2011_012

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Frank Neffke & Martin Henning & Ron Boschma, 2011. "How Do Regions Diversify over Time? Industry Relatedness and the Development of New Growth Paths in Regions," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 87(3), pages 237-265, July.
    2. Susan Christopherson & Jonathan Michie & Peter Tyler, 2010. "Regional resilience: theoretical and empirical perspectives," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 3(1), pages 3-10.
    3. Ron Boschma & Ron Martin, 2010. "The Aims and Scope of Evolutionary Economic Geography," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2006. "Path dependence and regional economic evolution," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(4), pages 395-437, August.
    5. Philip Cooke, 2010. "Transversality and Transition: Branching to New Regional Path Dependence," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1010, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Sep 2010.
    6. Ron Boschma & Koen Frenken, 2009. "Technological relatedness and regional branching," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0907, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Jun 2009.
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    Cited by:

    1. Manuela, Wilfred S. & de Vera, Manuel J., 2015. "The impact of government failure on tourism in the Philippines," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 11-22.

    More about this item


    Resilience; Maritime Cluster; Deepwater Horizon; Path Dependence;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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