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Land degradation in Ethiopia: What do stoves have to do with it?

Author

Listed:
  • Zenebe Gebreegziabher
  • G. Cornelis van Kooten
  • Daan van Soest

Abstract

Land degradation is a particularly vexing problem in developing countries; as forests are depleted, crop residues and dung are used for fuel, which degrades cropland. In Ethiopia, the government encourages tree planting and adoption of energy efficient stove technologies to mitigate land degradation. We use data from 200 households in Tigrai, Ethiopia to examine the adoption of new stove technologies. Adoption is an economic decision, related to savings in time spent collecting fuel and cooking, and cattle required for everyday purposes. Results indicate adopters of efficient stoves reduce respective wood and dung use by 68 and 316 kg per month.

Suggested Citation

  • Zenebe Gebreegziabher & G. Cornelis van Kooten & Daan van Soest, 2005. "Land degradation in Ethiopia: What do stoves have to do with it?," Working Papers 2005-16, University of Victoria, Department of Economics, Resource Economics and Policy Analysis Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:rep:wpaper:2005-16
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    File URL: https://web.uvic.ca/~repa/publications/REPA%20working%20papers/WorkingPaper2005-16.pdf
    File Function: Final version, 2005
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    Cited by:

    1. Beyene, Abebe D. & Koch, Steven F., 2013. "Clean fuel-saving technology adoption in urban Ethiopia," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 605-613.
    2. Jolejole-Foreman, Maria Christina & Baylis, Katherine R. & Lipper, Leslie, 2012. "Land Degradation’s Implications on Agricultural Value of Production in Ethiopia: A look inside the bowl," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126251, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. repec:eee:eneeco:v:67:y:2017:i:c:p:337-345 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    land degradation; technology adoption; Africa; Ethiopia;

    JEL classification:

    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation

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