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Public Information and Monetary Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Ted Temzelides

    (University of Pittsburgh)

  • Cyril Monnet

    (FRB Philadelphia)

  • Marie Hoerova

    (ECB)

Abstract

We study the nature of monetary policy in a model where uncertainty can lead to a discrepancy between economic agents' beliefs and true fundamentals. Monetary policy transmits information about fundamentals. The public nature of this information can help agents to coordinate their decisions. This comes at a cost, however, since monetary policy may lead the private sector to coordinate on the wrong fundamentals and it may result in inflation. We discuss conditions under which monetary policy will be unambiguously welfare-improving. We formalize the notion that monetary policy is equivalent to information revelation by the central bank, and offer an information-based (as opposed to the standard liquidity-based) argument for why higher nominal rate hikes occur less frequently than lower ones.

Suggested Citation

  • Ted Temzelides & Cyril Monnet & Marie Hoerova, 2008. "Public Information and Monetary Policy," 2008 Meeting Papers 5, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed008:5
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2008/paper_5.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Guillaume Rocheteau & Randall Wright, 2005. "Money in Search Equilibrium, in Competitive Equilibrium, and in Competitive Search Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, pages 175-202.
    2. Iván Werning & George-Marios Angeletos, 2006. "Crises and Prices: Information Aggregation, Multiplicity, and Volatility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1720-1736.
    3. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1972. "Expectations and the neutrality of money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 103-124, April.
    4. Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2005. "A Unified Framework for Monetary Theory and Policy Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(3), pages 463-484, June.
    5. Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2008. "Coordinating Expectations in Monetary Policy," Chapters,in: Central Banks as Economic Institutions, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Cass, David & Shell, Karl, 1983. "Do Sunspots Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 193-227, April.
    7. George-Marios Angeletos & Guido Lorenzoni & Alessandro Pavan, 2007. "Wall Street and Silicon Valley: A Delicate Interaction," NBER Working Papers 13475, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Taipalus, Katja, 2012. "Detecting asset price bubbles with time-series methods," Scientific Monographs, Bank of Finland, number 2012_047, November.

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