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How Sensitive are Sports Fans to Unemployment?

Author

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  • J. James Reade

    (Department of Economics, University of Reading)

  • Jan van Ours

    (Erasmus School of Economics, Tinbergen Institute)

Abstract

We analyze attendance of professional football matches in England finding that it is related to unemployment over a very long period of time. More unemployment leads to lower attendances. Distinguishing between leagues, we find that the relationship is larger for lower leagues, i.e. attendance of lower quality football events are more sensitive to fluctuations in unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • J. James Reade & Jan van Ours, 2021. "How Sensitive are Sports Fans to Unemployment?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2021-12, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  • Handle: RePEc:rdg:emxxdp:em-dp2021-12
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    File URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/files/economics/emdp202112.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stefan Szymanski, 2010. "Income Inequality, Competitive Balance and the Attractiveness of Team Sports: Some Evidence and a Natural Experiment from English Soccer," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Football Economics and Policy, chapter 9, pages 182-201, Palgrave Macmillan.
    2. Jennett, Nicholas I, 1984. "Attendances, Uncertainty of Outcome and Policy in Scottish League Football," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 31(2), pages 176-198, June.
    3. R. Todd Jewell & Rob Simmons & Stefan Szymanski, 2014. "Bad for Business? The Effects of Hooliganism on English Professional Football Clubs," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 15(5), pages 429-450, October.
    4. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    5. Jan C van Ours, 2021. "Common international trends in football stadium attendance," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 16(3), pages 1-19, March.
    6. Babatunde Buraimo & Giuseppe Migali & Rob Simmons, 2020. "Impacts Of The Great Recession On Sport: Evidence From English Football League Attendance Demand," Working Papers 202019, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    7. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
    8. Baimbridge, Mark & Cameron, Samuel & Dawson, Peter, 1996. "Satellite Television and the Demand for Football: A Whole New Ball Game?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 317-333, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stadium attendance; football; unemployment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • Z21 - Other Special Topics - - Sports Economics - - - Industry Studies
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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