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Solving Linear Rational Expectations Models with Predictable Structural Changes

Author

Listed:
  • Adam Cagliarini

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Mariano Kulish

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract

Standard solution methods for linear stochastic models with rational expectations presuppose a time-invariant structure as well as an environment in which shocks are unanticipated. Consequently, credible announcements that entail future changes of the structure cannot be handled by standard solution methods. This paper develops the solution for linear stochastic rational expectations models in the face of a finite sequence of anticipated structural changes. These events encompass anticipated changes to the structural parameters and anticipated additive shocks. We apply the solution technique to some examples of practical relevance to monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Adam Cagliarini & Mariano Kulish, 2008. "Solving Linear Rational Expectations Models with Predictable Structural Changes," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2008-10, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:rba:rbardp:rdp2008-10
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    File URL: https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2008/pdf/rdp2008-10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Harald F. Uhlig, 1995. "A toolkit for analyzing nonlinear dynamic stochastic models easily," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 101, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    2. Roger E.A. Farmer & Daniel F. Waggoner & Tao Zha, 2007. "Understanding the New-Keynesian Model when Monetary Policy Switches Regimes," NBER Working Papers 12965, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Anderson, Gary S., 2010. "A reliable and computationally efficient algorithm for imposing the saddle point property in dynamic models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 472-489, March.
    4. Troy Davig & Eric M. Leeper, 2007. "Generalizing the Taylor Principle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 607-635, June.
    5. Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus & Tapia, Matias, 2002. "Inflation targeting in Chile," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 125-146, August.
    6. Klein, Paul, 2000. "Using the generalized Schur form to solve a multivariate linear rational expectations model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(10), pages 1405-1423, September.
    7. Binder,M. & Pesaran,H.M., 1995. "Multivariate Rational Expectations Models and Macroeconomic Modelling: A Review and Some New Results," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9415, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    8. Sims, Christopher A, 2002. "Solving Linear Rational Expectations Models," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 20(1-2), pages 1-20, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Giovanni Angelini & Luca Fanelli, 2016. "Misspecification and Expectations Correction in New Keynesian DSGE Models," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(5), pages 623-649, October.
    2. Mariano Kulish & James Morley & Tim Robinson, 2014. "Estimating DSGE models with forward guidance," Discussion Papers 2014-32A, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    3. Marco Del Negro & Marc P. Giannoni & Frank Schorfheide, 2015. "Inflation in the Great Recession and New Keynesian Models," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 168-196, January.
    4. Haberis, Alex & Harrison, Richard & Waldron, Matt, 2019. "Uncertain policy promises," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 459-474.
    5. Mariano Kulish & Adrian Pagan, 2017. "Estimation and Solution of Models with Expectations and Structural Changes," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(2), pages 255-274, March.
    6. Andrew Binning & Junior Maih, 2016. "Implementing the Zero Lower Bound in an Estimated Regime-Switching DSGE Model," Working Papers No 3/2016, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    7. Gomez-Gonzalez, Patricia & Rees, Daniel M., 2018. "Same Spain, less pain?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 78-107.
    8. Callum Jones & Mariano Kulish, 2016. "A graphical representation of an estimated DSGE model," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(6), pages 483-489, February.
    9. Andrew Binning & Junior Maih, 2017. "Modelling Occasionally Binding Constraints Using Regime-Switching," Working Paper 2017/23, Norges Bank.
    10. Kulish, Mariano & Morley, James & Robinson, Tim, 2017. "Estimating DSGE models with zero interest rate policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 35-49.
    11. Luis Uzeda & Callum Jones, 2013. "Detection of anticipated structural changes in a rational expectations environment," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(14), pages 1322-1327, September.
    12. Mariano Kulish & James Morley & Tim Robinson, 2014. "Estimating the Expected Duration of the Zero Lower Bound in DSGE Models with Forward Guidance," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n16, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    13. Jones, Callum & Kulish, Mariano, 2013. "Long-term interest rates, risk premia and unconventional monetary policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 2547-2561.
    14. Castelnuovo, Efrem & Pellegrino, Giovanni, 2018. "Uncertainty-dependent effects of monetary policy shocks: A new-Keynesian interpretation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 277-296.
    15. Gibbs, Christopher G. & Kulish, Mariano, 2017. "Disinflations in a model of imperfectly anchored expectations," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 157-174.
    16. Christophe Cahn & Julien Matheron & Jeanā€Guillaume Sahuc, 2017. "Assessing the Macroeconomic Effects of LTROs during the Great Recession," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 49(7), pages 1443-1482, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    structural change; anticipated shocks; rational expectations;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E47 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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