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Share reform and the performance of China�s listed companies

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Abstract

The latest round of share reform in China, which began in 2005, sets two related processes in motion: it increases the tradable share proportion and signals the start of a decline in the government-owned share proportion. This paper considers the effect these processes might have on firm performance in the future by analysing the impact the above share proportions had on firm performance immediately prior to reform commencing. The government-owned share proportion is found to exert a linear and positive impact on firm performance. Further, it is revealed that this impact is best explained by the high ownership concentration of government shareholdings. The policy implication is that simply making all shares tradable need not lead to better firm performance. Rather, a more pertinent consideration is whether shareholdings become more or less diffuse, and this highlights the importance of non-government institutional investors playing a more prominent role than they currently do.

Suggested Citation

  • James Laurenceson & Bing Bing Jiang & Kam Ki Tang, "undated". "Share reform and the performance of China�s listed companies," EAERG Discussion Paper Series 1005, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uqeaer:10
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    File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/eaerg/dp/EAERG_DP10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bai, Chong-En & Liu, Qiao & Lu, Joe & Song, Frank M. & Zhang, Junxi, 2004. "Corporate governance and market valuation in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 599-616, December.
    2. Wei, Zuobao & Varela, Oscar, 2003. "State equity ownership and firm market performance: evidence from China's newly privatized firms," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 65-82, May.
    3. Paul McGuinness & Michael Ferguson, 2005. "The ownership structure of listed Chinese State-owned enterprises and its relation to corporate performance," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 231-246.
    4. repec:bla:joares:v:38:y:2000:i:1:p:103-126 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sun, Qian & Tong, Wilson H. S., 2003. "China share issue privatization: the extent of its success," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 183-222, November.
    6. Qian Sun & Wilson H. S. Tong & Jing Tong, 2002. "How Does Government Ownership Affect Firm Performance? Evidence from China's Privatization Experience," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(1&2), pages 1-27.
    7. Xiaozu Wang & Lixin Colin Xu & Tian Zhu, 2004. "State-owned enterprises going public "The case of China"," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 12(3), pages 467-487, September.
    8. Demurger, Sylvie, 2001. "Infrastructure Development and Economic Growth: An Explanation for Regional Disparities in China?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 95-117, March.
    9. Wang, Changyun, 2005. "Ownership and operating performance of Chinese IPOs," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(7), pages 1835-1856, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. David Greenaway & Alessandra Guariglia & Zhihong Yu, 2014. "The more the better? Foreign ownership and corporate performance in China," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(7-9), pages 681-702, September.
    2. Gabe de Bondt & Tuomas Peltonen & Daniel Santabarbara, 2011. "Booms and busts in China's stock market: estimates based on fundamentals," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(5), pages 287-300.

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