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South African Trends in Health Outcomes and Health-Related Behaviour: Evidence from Repeated Cross-Sectional Surveys

Author

Listed:
  • Kehinde Omotoso

    (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

  • Steven F. Koch

    (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

Abstract

This study examines trends in ill-health status, medical aid coverage and public health care facility utilisation across a spectrum of socio-demographic variables, using population- weighted General Household Surveys (GHS) covering the years 2004-2014. As there are few obvious patterns in the raw health variables' time series, the analysis, which is descriptive in nature, relies upon both parametric and nonparametric analysis to smooth the time series in order to outline a few general trends. Over time, medical aid coverage and the general population's `preference' for public health care decreased by 0.2% and 0.1% per year, respectively, while reports of ill-health status increased by 0.4% annually. Moreover, the probability that an individual, who is covered by a medical aid scheme, would utilize public health care decreased by 44%.

Suggested Citation

  • Kehinde Omotoso & Steven F. Koch, 2016. "South African Trends in Health Outcomes and Health-Related Behaviour: Evidence from Repeated Cross-Sectional Surveys," Working Papers 201650, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:201650
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anna S. Brink and Steven F. Koch, 2014. "User Fee Abolition in South Africa in 1994 and 1996: Differences-in-Differences," Working Papers 430, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    2. Steven F. Koch, 2009. "Equity in Private Health Insurance Coverage in South Africa: 2002-2007," Working Papers 200916, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Mcintyre, Di & Thiede, Michael & Birch, Stephen, 2009. "Access as a policy-relevant concept in low- and middle-income countries," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 179-193, April.
    4. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10510 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Burgard, Sarah A. & Treiman, Donald J., 2006. "Trends and racial differences in infant mortality in South Africa," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(5), pages 1126-1137, March.
    6. Culyer, A. J. & Wagstaff, Adam, 1993. "Equity and equality in health and health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 431-457, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kehinde O. Omotoso & Steven F. Koch, 2017. "Gender Differentials in Health: A Differences-in-Decompositions Estimate," Working Papers 201717, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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