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Emerging Structure of Rajasthan Economy in India


  • Singh, Inderjeet
  • Lila, Anshu


The excess growth of tertiary sector coupled with state-of-the-art technology has got its own implication for the future development patterns of the system. In India, the share of tertiary sector in the gross domestic product has crossed the fifty-five percent mark. Rajasthan, a state of India characterized by easy access to largest consumer markets, touches six major states of the Northern, Western and Central India. It is a natural corridor between the wealthy Northern and the prosperous Western states of the country, which make it an important trade and commerce center. The tertiary sector is emerging as the dominant sector of the economy. The nature and role of this tertiary sector growth is a matter of concern. This work is an attempt to analyze the emerging structure of Rajasthan economy and its implications for the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Singh, Inderjeet & Lila, Anshu, 2012. "Emerging Structure of Rajasthan Economy in India," MPRA Paper 43522, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 Dec 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:43522

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Zvi Griliches, 1992. "Output Measurement in the Service Sectors," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gril92-1, January.
    2. Anitesh Barua & Charles H. Kriebel & Tridas Mukhopadhyay, 1995. "Information Technologies and Business Value: An Analytic and Empirical Investigation," Information Systems Research, INFORMS, vol. 6(1), pages 3-23, March.
    3. Zvi Griliches, 1992. "Introduction to "Output Measurement in the Service Sectors"," NBER Chapters,in: Output Measurement in the Service Sectors, pages 1-22 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Peter Hill, 1999. "Tangibles, intangibles and services: a new taxonomy for the classification of output," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(2), pages 426-446, April.
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    More about this item


    Structure; Structural Change; Tertiary Sector; Rajasthan;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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