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Pasinetti’s Structural Change and Economic Growth: a conceptual excursus

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  • Garbellini, Nadia
  • Wirkierman, Ariel Luis

Abstract

A clear and organic exposition of Pasinetti’s theoretical framework of Structural Change and Economic Growth is often complicated by misunderstandings and ambiguities concerning the basic categories and terminology. The pre-institutional character of the approach, the nature of its equilibrium paths and the significance of the ‘natural’ economic system — together with its normative character — are some of the most controversial issues. In particular, there seems to be a need for a clearcut distinction between the general dynamic analysis of the price and quantity systems and the specific dynamics they follow when the sectoral proportions and levels of production exactly satisfy dynamic equilibrium conditions, and a particular closure of the price system is adopted, providing for specific functional income distribution and theory of value. The aim of the present paper is therefore that of attempting at a conceptual excursus of the model, in order to establish a solid ground on the basis of which discussions with other Classical approaches can be fruitfully held.

Suggested Citation

  • Garbellini, Nadia & Wirkierman, Ariel Luis, 2010. "Pasinetti’s Structural Change and Economic Growth: a conceptual excursus," MPRA Paper 25685, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25685
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Silva, Ester G. & Teixeira, Aurora A.C., 2008. "Surveying structural change: Seminal contributions and a bibliometric account," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 273-300, December.
    2. Garbellini, Nadia & Wirkierman, Ariel, 2009. "Changes in the productivity of labour and vertically integrated sectors — an empirical study for Italy," MPRA Paper 18871, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Luigi L. Pasinetti, 2005. "The Cambridge School of Keynesian Economics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(6), pages 837-848, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brondino, Gabriel, 2019. "Productivity growth and structural change in China (1995–2009): A subsystems analysis," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 183-191.
    2. Richard Senner & Didier Sornette, 2019. "The Holy Grail of Crypto Currencies: Ready to Replace Fiat Money?," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(4), pages 966-1000, October.
    3. Garbellini, Nadia, 2010. "Structural Change and Economic Growth: Production in the Short Run — A generalisation in terms of vertically hyper-integrated sectors," MPRA Paper 25684, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Alessandro Sarra & Claudio Berardino & Davide Quaglione, 2019. "Deindustrialization and the technological intensity of manufacturing subsystems in the European Union," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 36(1), pages 205-243, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Vertically (hyper-)integrated sectors; functional income distribution; ‘natural’ economic rates of profit; ‘natural’ economic system; pure labour theory of value.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B51 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Socialist; Marxian; Sraffian
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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