IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Infant Mortality Situation in Bangladesh in 2007: A District Level Analysis

  • Ahamad, Mazbahul Golam
  • Tasnima, Kaniz
  • Khaled, Nafisa
  • Bairagi, Subir Kanti
  • Deb, Uttam Kumar

District level trend of infant mortality rate (IMR) per thousand live births in Bangladesh influenced by some assorted form of socio-demographic determinants such as individual, household and community level factors. This paper examines the trend and annual rate of reduction from 1998-2007 time periods and correlates causal factors based on different data from Statistical Yearbook of Bangladesh 2008 and Sample Vital Registration System 2007. Seven explanatory variables are considered and the log-log specified ordinary least square and simultaneous quantile regression models are employed to investigate and compare the stochastic impacts of these predictors on changing infant mortality. Infant immunization is the most effective factor that reduces infant mortality especially at lower quantile districts. Most notably, lower poverty line implies increasing trend with upper quantile, indicates that districts with low infant mortality rate has low effect for any positive rate of change of it. The least square as well as simultaneous quantile regression result disclose that share of population lived in electricity accessed houses, road density, no. of female per family planning personnel has potential and statistically significant impacts on infant mortality rate that is -0.25%, -0.22% and -0.58% respectively. Likewise, infant mortality decreased with the increased percentage of household having television by 0.08%, on average. As infant mortality is an outcome from a variety of socio-economic disparity; reduction strategy should address the degree of severity of the risk factors on infant mortality, prioritizing the most effective reducing factors such as infant immunization and controlled population growth rate as well.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/21102/1/MPRA_paper_21102.pdf
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 21102.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 10 Feb 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:21102
Contact details of provider: Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Sarah Ssewanyana & Stephen D. Younger, 2008. "Infant Mortality in Uganda: Determinants, Trends and the Millennium Development Goals," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 17(1), pages 34-61, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:21102. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.