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Were Canadian Exports to the U.S. Curtailed by the Post-9/11 Thickening of the U.S. Border?


  • Grady, Patrick


The paper examines the data for Canadian exports to the United States that have been cited as prima facie evidence of a "thickening of the border." It estimates that Canadian exports of goods, excluding energy and forestry products, to the United States have been 12.5 per cent lower than would have been expected based on estimated relationships and exports of services 8 per cent lower. These estimates suggest that the boost to Canadian exports resulting from the FTA/NAFTA has been substantially eroded.

Suggested Citation

  • Grady, Patrick, 2009. "Were Canadian Exports to the U.S. Curtailed by the Post-9/11 Thickening of the U.S. Border?," MPRA Paper 21047, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:21047

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Grady, Patrick & Macmillan, Kathleen, 1998. "Why Is Interprovincial Trade Down and International Trade Up?," MPRA Paper 8710, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marcel Mérette & Patrick Georges & Qi Zhang, 2011. "Foreign Direct Investment and Border Security Issues-- A Multi-Country, Multi-Sector Computable General Equilibrium Framework," EcoMod2011 3044, EcoMod.
    2. Steven Globerman & Paul Storer, 2009. "Border Security and Canadian Exports to the United States: Evidence and Policy Implications," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 35(2), pages 171-186, June.
    3. Patrick Georges & Marcel Mérette & Qi Zhang, 2012. "Toward a North American Security Perimeter? Assessing the Trade and FDI Impacts of Liberalizing 9/11 Security Measures," Working Papers 1204E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    4. Patrick Georges, 2017. "Canada’s Trade Policy Options under Donald Trump: NAFTA’s rules of origin, Canada-U.S. security perimeter, and Canada’s geographical trade diversification opportunities," Working Papers 1707E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    5. Georges, Patrick & Mérette, Marcel, 2012. "Toward a North American Security Perimeter? Assessing the trade, FDI, and welfare impacts of liberalizing 9/11 security measures," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2514-2526.
    6. Grady, Patrick, 2009. "A More Open and Secure Border for Trade, Investment and People," MPRA Paper 17240, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    Canadian Exports; Canada-U.S. Border; Post 9/11 Security; Free Trade Agreement; North American Free Trade Agreement;

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations

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