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Households and entrepreneurship in England and Wales, 1851-1911

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Listed:
  • Smith, Harry
  • Bennett, Robert J.
  • van Lieshout, Carry
  • Montebruno, Piero

Abstract

This article uses the British Business Census of Entrepreneurs (BBCE) to examine the relationship between the household and entrepreneurship in England and Wales between 1851 and 1911. The BBCE allows three kinds of entrepreneurial households to be identified: those where an entrepreneur employs co-resident family members in their business, those where two or more household members are partners in the same firm, and households with two or more entrepreneurs resident who are running different firms. The article traces the number of these different households across the period and examines their sector and gender breakdowns as well as their geographical distribution. The article demonstrates that these different kinds of entrepreneurial households served different purposes; co-resident family businesses were used in marginal areas where other sources of labour and capital were scarce and the incidence of such firms decreased over this period. In contrast, household partnerships and co-entrepreneurial households were used to share risk or diversify; they were found throughout England and Wales at similar levels during this period.

Suggested Citation

  • Smith, Harry & Bennett, Robert J. & van Lieshout, Carry & Montebruno, Piero, 2020. "Households and entrepreneurship in England and Wales, 1851-1911," MPRA Paper 102647, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:102647
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Quentin Outram, 2017. "The demand for residential domestic service in the London of 1901," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(3), pages 893-918, August.
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    3. Burnette,Joyce, 2008. "Gender, Work and Wages in Industrial Revolution Britain," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521880633, October.
    4. van Lieshout, Carry & Smith, Harry & Montebruno, Piero & Bennett, Robert, 2019. "Female entrepreneurship: business, marriage and motherhood in England and Wales, 1851–1911," MPRA Paper 101452, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Xuesheng You, 2020. "Women's labour force participation in nineteenth‐century England and Wales: evidence from the 1881 census enumerators’ books," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 73(1), pages 106-133, February.
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    7. Barker, Hannah, 2017. "Family and Business during the Industrial Revolution," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198786023.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bennett, Robert J. & Smith, Harry & Montebruno, Piero & van Lieshout, Carry, 2021. "Changes in Victorian entrepreneurship in England and Wales 1851-1911: methodology and business population estimates," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108959, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; household; census; England and Wales; economic history;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • N83 - Economic History - - Micro-Business History - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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