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Armenia: What drives first movers and how can their efforts be scaled up?


  • Minoian, Victoria
  • Freinkman, Lev


The paper examines ways to expand the contribution of the Armenian diaspora to Armenia’s long-term development agenda. It identifies factors that could explain the involvement and dynamics of a small group of entrepreneurs from the diaspora who have been active in and with Armenia. Based on these findings, it develops recommendations, consistent with the diaspora’s institutional capabilities, for increasing the number of such business activists and transforming diaspora efforts from humanitarian relief campaigns to business initiatives and development projects. The findings are based on detailed interviews with a group of prominent diaspora activists.

Suggested Citation

  • Minoian, Victoria & Freinkman, Lev, 2005. "Armenia: What drives first movers and how can their efforts be scaled up?," MPRA Paper 10010, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:10010

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kate Gillespie & Liesl Riddle & Edward Sayre & David Sturges, 1999. "Diaspora Interest in Homeland Investment," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 30(3), pages 623-634, September.
    2. Freinkman, Lev, 2000. "Role Of The Diasporas In Transition Economies: Lessons From Armenia," MPRA Paper 10013, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2013. "Republic of Armenia : Accumulation, Competition, and Connectivity," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16781, The World Bank.

    More about this item


    diaspora; Armenia; diaspora mobilization; diaspora expertise for development;

    JEL classification:

    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • P27 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Performance and Prospects
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers


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