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I divari di genere nella financial literacy: un'indagine empirica

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  • E. Bocchialini

    ()

  • B. Ronchini

    ()

Abstract

Lo studio indaga il livello di educazione finanziaria di un campione di 1.087 giovani frequentanti distinti percorsi formativi di livello universitario, con l’obiettivo di verificare l’esistenza di divari di genere in termini di livello di conoscenze finanziarie e di attitudini verso le materie finanziarie. Il grado di literacy finanziaria è misurato tramite un test di 27 domande a risposta multipla. I risultati dell’analisi empirica evidenziano che esistono differenze sistematiche tra maschi e femmine in termini di financial literacy. Sebbene il livello di educazione finanziaria riscontrato nel campione non appaia, in media, particolarmente elevato, le ragazze mostrano comunque una peggiore preparazione in campo finanziario. Esse palesano un’inferiore propensione a tenersi informate sulle tematiche finanziarie, minore interesse verso tale ambito disciplinare e scarsa self confidence al riguardo. Rispetto alle controparti maschili, si dichiarano tuttavia relativamente più propense a partecipare a eventuali progetti di educazione finanziaria. Alcune implicazioni di policy sono discusse nel lavoro con indicazioni per la ricerca futura.

Suggested Citation

  • E. Bocchialini & B. Ronchini, 2015. "I divari di genere nella financial literacy: un'indagine empirica," Economics Department Working Papers 2015-EF01, Department of Economics, Parma University (Italy).
  • Handle: RePEc:par:dipeco:2015-ef01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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