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Methodological Issues Associated with Combining Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Understanding Poverty Dynamics: Evidence from Uganda

  • David Lawson

The paper draws from ongoing research that aims to genuinely combine qualitative and quantitative (`Q-Squared`) research methodologies to further our understanding of poverty dynamics in Uganda. Using existing nationally representative panel data we use the same sampling frame and extend the panel by visiting the same households - collecting both life histories and further quantitative data, with the intention being, for this first paper in a series of outputs, to consider some of the methodological issues that are of importance when combining such research methods and furthering our knowledge of poverty dynamics. Overall we find that even when using relatively `dated` panel data as a base for `Q-Squared` work, although this may not be ideal for the sequencing and triangulation of data if undertaken correctly this can still provide the basis for very unique insights regarding key factors that underpin poverty dynamics.

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File URL: http://www.gprg.org/pubs/workingpapers/pdfs/gprg-wps-077.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number GPRG-WPS-077.

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Date of creation: 01 May 2007
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:gprg-wps-077
Contact details of provider: Postal: Manor Rd. Building, Oxford, OX1 3UQ
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  1. David Lawson, 2005. "Poverty Persistence and Transitions in Uganda: A Combined Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-004, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Adato, Michelle & Lund, Francie & Mhlongo, Phakama, 2007. "Methodological Innovations in Research on the Dynamics of Poverty: A Longitudinal Study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 247-263, February.
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