IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/otg/wpaper/1107.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Determinants of Relative Price Variability during a Recession: Evidence from Canada at the Time of the Great Depression

Author

Listed:
  • David Fielding

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

  • Chris Hajzler

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

  • Jim MacGee

    () (Department of Economics, University of Western Ontario)

Abstract

Most studies find that relative price variability (RPV) is a U-shaped or V-shaped function of anticipated inflation, and a V-shaped function of unanticipated inflation. One exception is Reinsdorf (1994), who finds that RPV in the United States during the 1980s recession was monotonically decreasing in unanticipated inflation. We suggest a reason for this difference, and test our conjecture using data from inter-war Canada. Our results indicate that in recessionary conditions a positive inflation shock does reduce RPV. However, this reduction is unlikely to correspond to higher consumer utility; this has implications for the conduct of monetary policy during a recession.

Suggested Citation

  • David Fielding & Chris Hajzler & Jim MacGee, 2011. "Determinants of Relative Price Variability during a Recession: Evidence from Canada at the Time of the Great Depression," Working Papers 1107, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:1107
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.otago.ac.nz/economics/research/otago076678.pdf
    File Function: This version, 2011
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pablo Selaya & Rainer Thiele, 2010. "Aid and Sectoral Growth: Evidence from Panel Data," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(10), pages 1749-1766.
    2. Rajan, Raghuram G. & Subramanian, Arvind, 2011. "Aid, Dutch disease, and manufacturing growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 106-118, January.
    3. Hristos Doucouliagos & Martin Paldam, 2009. "The Aid Effectiveness Literature: The Sad Results Of 40 Years Of Research," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 433-461, July.
    4. Corden, W M, 1984. "Booming Sector and Dutch Disease Economics: Survey and Consolidation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(3), pages 359-380, November.
    5. Laplagne, Patrick & Treadgold, Malcolm & Baldry, Jonathan, 2001. "A Model of Aid Impact in Some South Pacific Microstates," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 365-383, February.
    6. Christopher S. Adam & David L. Bevan, 2006. "Aid and the Supply Side: Public Investment, Export Performance, and Dutch Disease in Low-Income Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(2), pages 261-290.
    7. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    8. Joong Shik Kang & Alessandro Prati & Alessandro Rebucci, 2012. "Aid, Exports, and Growth: a Time-Series Perspective on the Dutch Disease Hypothesis," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 3(2).
    9. Christopher Adam & Stephen A O`Connell, 2000. "Aid versus Trade Revisited," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2000-19, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    10. Thierry Tressel & Alessandro Prati, 2006. "Aid Volatility and Dutch Disease; Is There a Role for Macroeconomic Policies?," IMF Working Papers 06/145, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Haideh Salehi-Esfahani, 1988. "Informationally Imperfect Labour Markets and the 'Dutch Disease' Problem," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 21(3), pages 617-624, August.
    12. Christopher S Adam & Stephen A O'Connell, 2004. "Aid versus Trade Revisited: Donor and Recipient Policies in the Presence of Learning-by-Doing," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(492), pages 150-173, January.
    13. Ambrogio Cesa‐Bianchi & Luis Felipe Cespedes & Alessandro Rebucci, 2015. "Global Liquidity, House Prices, and the Macroeconomy: Evidence from Advanced and Emerging Economies," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(S1), pages 301-335, March.
    14. White, Howard & Wignaraja, Ganeshan, 1992. "Exchange rates, trade liberalization and aid: The Sri Lankan experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(10), pages 1471-1480, October.
    15. van Wijnbergen, Sweder J G, 1984. "The 'Dutch Disease': A Disease after All?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(373), pages 41-55, March.
    16. Vos, Rob, 1998. "Aid Flows and "Dutch Disease" in a General Equilibrium Framework for Pakistan," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 77-109, February.
    17. Christopher S. Adam & David L. Bevan, 2003. "Aid, Public Expenditure and Dutch Disease," CSAE Working Paper Series 2003-02, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    18. Yves Bourdet & Hans Falck, 2006. "Emigrants' remittances and Dutch Disease in Cape Verde," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 267-284.
    19. Bazoumana Ouattara & Eric Strobl, 2008. "Foreign Aid Inflows And The Real Exchange Rate In The Cfa Franc Zone," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 116, pages 37-52.
    20. Perotti, Roberto & Alesina, Alberto, 1996. "Income Distribution, Political Instability, and Investment," Scholarly Articles 4553018, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    21. David Fielding, 2010. "Aid and Dutch Disease in the South Pacific and in Other Small Island States," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(5), pages 918-940.
    22. Elbadawi, Ibrahim A, 1999. "External Aid: Help or Hindrance to Export Orientation in Africa?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 8(4), pages 578-616, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Fielding & Chris Hajzler, 2013. "Comment on Relative Price Variability and Inflation in Reinganum's Consumer Search Model," Working Papers 1305, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2013.
    2. repec:rej:journl:v:19:y:2016:i:61:p:193-210 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Nebiye Yamak & Sinem Kocak & Fatma Kolcu, 2016. "Causal Relationship Between Relative Price Variability and Inflation in Turkey:Evidence from Panel Data," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 19(60), pages 183-198, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Relative price variability; Inflation; Canada; Great Depression;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • N1 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:1107. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Janet Bryant). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/etotanz.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.