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Dynamic Gains from Trade: The Role of Intermediate Inputs and Equipment Imports

Author

Listed:
  • Susan Stone

    (OECD)

  • Ben Shepherd

    (Developing Trade Consultants Ltd.)

Abstract

Dynamic gains from trade can be an important conduit for increased firm-level innovation and productivity, both key components of economic growth. This paper builds on previous research on the dynamic gains from trade by moving beyond a single country basis to examine impacts on firm-level productivity for a cross-section of countries. It also focuses on productivity gains through the import of intermediate inputs and capital goods and systematically explores the specific impacts of non-trade, or complementary, policies on firms‘ ability to realise dynamic gains. This paper shows that a range of complementary policies affects a firm‘s ability to generate productivity gains from intermediate and capital goods imports. Access to skilled labour is a particularly important policy variable with respect to the import of intermediate goods, followed by access to finance, while macroeconomic stability slightly outranks access to finance for capital goods importers. The importance of access to finance has particular policy significance given the wide-spread financial reforms being discussed or underway.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan Stone & Ben Shepherd, 2011. "Dynamic Gains from Trade: The Role of Intermediate Inputs and Equipment Imports," OECD Trade Policy Papers 110, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:traaab:110-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kgf17f17ks1-en
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2017. "Caught In The Middle? The Economics Of Middle-Income Traps," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(3), pages 771-791, July.
    2. International Monetary Fund, 2014. "France; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 14/183, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Andrey Gnidchenko & Anastasia Mogilat & Olga Mikheeva & Vladimir Salnikov, 2016. "Foreign Technology Transfer: An Assessment of Russia’s Economic Dependence on High-Tech Imports," Foresight-Russia Форсайт, CyberLeninka;Федеральное государственное автономное образовательное учреждение высшего образования «Национальный исследовательский университет «Высшая школа экономики», vol. 10(1 (eng)), pages 53-67.
    4. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano, 2015. "Middle-income growth traps," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 641-660.
    5. Pierre-Richard AGENOR, 2016. "Caught in the Middle? The Economics of Middle-Income Traps," Working Papers P142, FERDI.
    6. Peter A. Petri & Michael G. Plummer, 2016. "The Economic Effects of the Trans-Pacific Partnership: New Estimates," Working Paper Series WP16-2, Peterson Institute for International Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital; complementary policies; dynamic gains; intermediate inputs; trade;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations

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