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OECD Forecasts During and After the Financial Crisis: A Post Mortem

Author

Listed:
  • Nigel Pain

    (OECD)

  • Christine Lewis

    (OECD)

  • Thai-Thanh Dang

    (OECD)

  • Yosuke Jin

    (OECD)

  • Pete Richardson

Abstract

This paper assesses the OECD’s projections for GDP growth and inflation during the global financial crisis and recovery, focussing on lessons that can be learned. The projections repeatedly over-estimated growth, failing to anticipate the extent of the slowdown and later the weak pace of the recovery – errors made by many other forecasters. At the same time, inflation was stronger than expected on average. Analysis of the growth errors shows that the OECD projections in the crisis years were larger in countries with more international trade openness and greater presence of foreign banks. In the recovery, there is little evidence that an underestimate of the impact of fiscal consolidation contributed significantly to forecast errors. Instead, the repeated conditioning assumption that the euro area crisis would stabilise or ease played an important role, with growth weaker than projected in European countries where bond spreads were higher than had been assumed. But placing these errors in a historical context illustrates that the errors were not without precedent: similar-sized errors were made in the first oil price shock of the 1970s. In response to the challenges encountered in forecasting in recent years and the lessons learnt, the OECD and other international organisations have sought to improve their forecasting techniques and procedures, to improve their ability to monitor near-term developments and to better account for international linkages and financial market developments. Prévisions de l'OCDE pendant et après la crise financière : Post mortem Ce document évalue les projections de l'OCDE relatives à la croissance du PIB et à l'inflation durant la crise financière mondiale et lors de la reprise, tout en mettant l'accent sur les leçons qui peuvent être tirées. Les projections ont surestimé la croissance de façon répétée, à défaut d'anticiper l'ampleur du ralentissement puis, plus tard, le faible rythme de la reprise — des erreurs commises par de nombreux autres prévisionnistes. Simultanément, l'inflation a été, en moyenne, plus forte que prévu. L'analyse des erreurs relatives à la croissance montre que les prévisions de l'OCDE durant les années de crise économiques ont été plus importantes dans les pays dotés d'une plus grande ouverture au commerce international et d'une plus grande présence de banques étrangères. Durant la reprise, il y a peu d'évidences qu'une sous-estimation de l'impact de la consolidation budgétaire ait conduit de manière significative aux erreurs. Au lieu de cela, l'hypothèse de conditionnement répétée que la crise de la zone euro devrait se stabiliser ou a joué un rôle important, avec une croissance plus faible que prévu dans les pays européens où les écarts de rendement des obligations étaient plus élevés que ce qui avait été supposé. Mais placer ces erreurs dans un contexte historique montre que les erreurs ne sont pas sans précédent: des erreurs de taille similaire ont été faites lors du premier choc des prix du pétrole dans les années 70. En réponse aux difficultés rencontrées dans les prévisions au cours des dernières années et les leçons apprises, l'OCDE et d'autres organisations internationales ont cherché à améliorer leurs techniques et procédures de prévision, afin d'améliorer leur capacité à surveiller l'évolution à court terme et à mieux appréhender les liens internationaux et l'évolution du marché financier

Suggested Citation

  • Nigel Pain & Christine Lewis & Thai-Thanh Dang & Yosuke Jin & Pete Richardson, 2014. "OECD Forecasts During and After the Financial Crisis: A Post Mortem," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1107, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:1107-en
    DOI: 10.1787/5jz73l1qw1s1-en
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1787/5jz73l1qw1s1-en
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Álvaro Pina, 2016. "Making public finances more growth and equity-friendly in the euro area," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1316, OECD Publishing.
    2. Lassaâd Mbarek & Hardik A. Marfatia & Sonja Juko, 2018. "Time-varying Response of Treasury Yields to Monetary Policy Shocks: Evidence from the Tunisian Bond Market," Working Papers 1243, Economic Research Forum, revised 23 Oct 2018.
    3. Nils Jannsen & Galina Potjagailo & Maik H. Wolters, 2019. "Monetary Policy during Financial Crises: Is the Transmission Mechanism Impaired?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 15(4), pages 81-126, October.
    4. Döpke, Jörg & Fritsche, Ulrich & Müller, Karsten, 2019. "Has macroeconomic forecasting changed after the Great Recession? Panel-based evidence on forecast accuracy and forecaster behavior from Germany," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    5. Jörg Döpke & Ulrich Fritsche & Karsten Müller, 2018. "Has Macroeconomic Forecasting changed after the Great Recession? - Panel-based Evidence on Accuracy and Forecaster Behaviour from Germany," Macroeconomics and Finance Series 201803, University of Hamburg, Department of Socioeconomics.
    6. Oguzhan Akgun & Alain Pirotte & Giovanni Urga & Zhenlin Yang, 2020. "Equal Predictive Ability Tests for Panel Data with an Application to OECD and IMF Forecasts," Papers 2003.02803, arXiv.org.
    7. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2019. "Uncertainty in Long-Term Macroeconomic Forecasts: Ex post Evaluation of Forecasts by Economics Researchers," Discussion papers 19084, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    8. Nicholas Apergis & Ioannis Pragidis, 2019. "Stock Price Reactions to Wire News from the European Central Bank: Evidence from Changes in the Sentiment Tone and International Market Indexes," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 25(1), pages 91-112, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic fluctuations; economic outlook; fiscal policy; fluctuations économiques; forecasting; inflation; inflation; performance économique; politique budgétaire; prévisions;

    JEL classification:

    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E27 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E66 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General Outlook and Conditions
    • F47 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises

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