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Waiting Tolerance: Ramp Delay vs. Freeway Congestion

Author

Listed:
  • David Levinson

    () (Nexus (Networks, Economics, and Urban Systems) Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota)

  • Kathleen Harder
  • John Bloomfield

    (College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, University of Minnesota)

  • Kathy Carlson

Abstract

Waiting tolerance at ramp meters and travel time on the freeway were measured using a computer administered stated preference (CASP) survey and a virtual experience stated preference (VESP) method employing a driving simulator.The selections varied in the number of minutes waiting at a ramp meter with vehicle speed once on the freeway. The subjects ranked the selections in order of preference. The results were statistically analyzed using a binary logit model controlling for demographics, socioeconomic characteristics, daily travel time, and personality scores.The results by the CASP method displayed a preference for freeway congestion to ramp delay, but opposite results were obtained by the VESP method. A number of reasons are posited to explain the difference, but the results indicate that method of stated preference data collection can significantly affect conclusions drawn.

Suggested Citation

  • David Levinson & Kathleen Harder & John Bloomfield & Kathy Carlson, 2006. "Waiting Tolerance: Ramp Delay vs. Freeway Congestion," Working Papers 200602, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:waitingtolerance
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    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/179943
    File Function: First version, 2007
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Carrion, Carlos & Levinson, David, 2012. "Value of travel time reliability: A review of current evidence," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 720-741.
    2. Zhu, Shanjiang & Levinson, David & Liu, Henry X. & Harder, Kathleen, 2010. "The traffic and behavioral effects of the I-35W Mississippi River bridge collapse," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 771-784, December.
    3. Pavithra Parthasarathi & Anupam Srivastava & Nikolas Geroliminis & David Levinson, 2011. "The importance of being early," Transportation, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 227-247, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ramp meters; Personality; Stated preference; Driving simulator; Travel time;

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior

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