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Part-Time Work vs. Full-Time Work of Married Women in Japan

  • Tadashi Yamada
  • Tetsuji Yamada

In this paper, we attempt to resolve the drawbacks in previous studies of the labor supply of women in Japan. We hypothesize here that the response to the socioeconomic factors that influence the decision to work varies among different groups of women, and we estimate separately the labor supply of part-time employed, and that of full-time employed, married women by using the 1980 Population Census data for Japan.The major finding is that there is a clear difference in the labor supply behavior of women who are employed part time and those who are employed full time. For example, the estimated elasticities are noticeably different for the following factors: women's wages, men's wages, the unemployment rate, the industry-mix variable, andthe provision of day-care centers and nursery schools. Our empirical results suggest that, in public policy implementation, giving special attention to the specific characteristics of the labor market of women in Japan would be useful and important in understanding the different responses to the factors influencing the decision to work among the different socioeconomic groups.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w1608.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 1608.

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Date of creation: Apr 1985
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Publication status: published as Quarterly Review of Economics and Business, Vol. 27, No. 1 pp. 41-50, Spring 1987.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:1608
Note: LS
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  1. Cain, Glen G & Dooley, Martin D, 1976. "Estimation of a Model of Labor Supply, Fertility, and Wages of Married Women," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages S179-99, August.
  2. Jacob Mincer, 1962. "Labor Force Participation of Married Women: A Study of Labor Supply," NBER Chapters, in: Aspects of Labor Economics, pages 63-105 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Heckman, James J, 1974. "Shadow Prices, Market Wages, and Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(4), pages 679-94, July.
  4. Leibowitz, Arleen, 1974. "Education and Home Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(2), pages 243-50, May.
  5. Reuben Gronau, 1973. "Wage Comparisons -A Selectivity Bias," NBER Working Papers 0013, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Ben-Porath, Yoram, 1973. "Labor-Force Participation Rates and the Supply of Labor," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 697-704, May-June.
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