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Modeling Option and Strategy Choices with Connectionist Networks: Towards an Integrative Model of Automatic and Deliberate Decision Making

Author

Listed:
  • Andreas Glöckner

    () (Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods, Bonn)

  • Tilmann Betsch

    (University of Erfurt)

Abstract

We claim that understanding human decisions requires that both automatic and deliberate processes be considered. First, we sketch the qualitative differences between two hypothetical processing systems, an automatic and a deliberate system. Second, we show the potential that connectionism offers for modeling processes of decision making and discuss some empirical evidence. Specifically, we posit that the integration of information and the application of a selection rule are governed by the automatic system. The deliberate system is assumed to be responsible for information search, inferences and the modification of the network that the automatic processes act on. Third, we critically evaluate the multiple-strategy approach to decision making. We introduce the basic assumption of an integrative approach stating that individuals apply an all-purpose rule for decisions but use different strategies for information search. Fourth, we develop a connectionist framework that explains the interaction between automatic and deliberate processes and is able to account for choices both at the option and at the strategy level.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Glöckner & Tilmann Betsch, 2008. "Modeling Option and Strategy Choices with Connectionist Networks: Towards an Integrative Model of Automatic and Deliberate Decision Making," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2008_02, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpg:wpaper:2008_2
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    File URL: http://www.coll.mpg.de/pdf_dat/2008_02online.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Julian N. Marewski & Katja Mehlhorn, 2011. "Using the ACT-R architecture to specify 39 quantitative process models of decision making," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(6), pages 439-519, August.
    2. Pieterse, Arwen H. & de Vries, Marieke & Kunneman, Marleen & Stiggelbout, Anne M. & Feldman-Stewart, Deb, 2013. "Theory-informed design of values clarification methods: A cognitive psychological perspective on patient health-related decision making," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 156-163.
    3. Andreas Glöckner, 2009. "Investigating intuitive and deliberate processes statistically: The multiple-measure maximum likelihood strategy classification method," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 4(3), pages 186-199, April.
    4. Nina Horstmann & Andrea Ahlgrimm & Andreas Glöckner, 2009. "How distinct are intuition and deliberation? An eye-tracking analysis of instruction-induced decision modes," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 4(5), pages 335-354, August.
    5. Andreas Gloeckner & Steffen Moritz, 2009. "A fine-grained analysis of the jumping-to-conclusions bias in schizophrenia: Data-gathering, response confidence, and information integration}," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 4(7), pages 587-600, December.
    6. Andreas Glöckner & Janet Kleber & Stephan Tontrup & Stefan Bechtold, 2009. "The Endowment Effect in Groups with and without Strategic Incentives," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2009_35, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    7. Marc Jekel & Susann Fiedler & Andreas Glockner, 2011. "Diagnostic task selection for strategy classification in judgment and decision making," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 782-799, December.
    8. Anne-Sophie Chaxel & J. Edward Russo & Neda Kerimi, 2013. "Preference-driven biases in decision makers' information search and evaluation," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 8(5), pages 561-576, September.
    9. Andreas Glöckner & Stephan Dickert, 2008. "Base-rate Respect by Intuition: Approximating Rational Choices in Base-rate Tasks with Multiple Cues," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2008_49, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    10. Andreas Glöckner & Ann-Katrin Herbold, 2008. "Information Processing in Decisions under Risk: Evidence for Compensatory Strategies based on Automatic Processes," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2008_42, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    11. Marc Jekel & Andreas Nicklisch & Andreas Gloeckner, 2010. "Implementation of the Multiple-Measure Maximum Likelihood strategy classification method in R: Addendum to Gloeckner (2009) and practical guide for application," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 5(1), pages 54-63, February.
    12. Stefan Scherbaum & Simon Frisch & Susanne Leiberg & Steven J. Lade & Thomas Goschke & Maja Dshemuchadse, 2016. "Process dynamics in delay discounting decisions: An attractor dynamics approach," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 11(5), pages 472-495, September.
    13. repec:jdm:journl:v:13:y:2018:i:1:p:1-22 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Andreas Glöckner & Tilmann Betsch & Nicola Schindler, 2008. "Coherence Shifts in Probabilistic Inference Tasks," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2008_14, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    15. repec:jdm:journl:v:12:y:2017:i:6:p:537-552 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Nina Horstmann & Andrea Ahlgrimm & Andreas Glöckner, 2009. "How Distinct are Intuition and Deliberation? An Eye-Tracking Analysis of Instruction-Induced Decision Modes," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2009_10, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    17. Glöckner, Andreas & Betsch, Tilmann, 2008. "Do people make decisions under risk based on ignorance? An empirical test of the priority heuristic against cumulative prospect theory," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 107(1), pages 75-95, September.
    18. Andreas Glockner & Tilmann Betsch, 2011. "The Empirical content of theories in judgment and decision making: Shortcomings and remedies," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 6(8), pages 711-721, December.
    19. Britta Herbig & Andreas Glöckner, 2009. "Experts and Decision Making: First Steps Towards a Unifying Theory of Decision Making in Novices, Intermediates and Experts," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2009_02, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    20. Christoph Engel, 2010. "The Multiple Uses of Experimental Evidence in Legal Scholarship," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 166(1), pages 199-202, March.
    21. A. Madureira & F. Hartog & N. Baken, 2016. "A holonic framework to understand and apply information processes in evolutionary economics: survey and proposal," Netnomics, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 157-190, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    System 1; Intuition; Reasoning; Control; Routines; Connectionist Model; Parallel Constraint Satisfaction;

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