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Access Holidays for Network Infrastructure Investment

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Abstract

The need for an access holiday to spur investment arises from the ex ante inability of regulators to commit to access prices that adequately reward investors for all relevant risks. A well designed access holiday can partially overcome the problem of regulatory commitment, and represents a second-best solution to this problem, by limiting regulatory intervention for a number of years. In this paper, we consider the underlying problem of investment incentives and access regulation. We also highlight precisely what an access holiday can and cannot do. In particular we highlight important practical issues that need to be considered regarding access holidays.

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  • Joshua Gans & Stephen King, 2003. "Access Holidays for Network Infrastructure Investment," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-39, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:archive-39
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    File URL: http://ringtail.its.monash.edu.au/pub/econ/RePEc/mos/moswps/Access_Investment.pdf
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    1. Sappington, David E M & Sibley, David S, 1988. "Regulating without Cost Information: The Incremental Surplus Subsidy Scheme," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 29(2), pages 297-306, May.
    2. Gans, Joshua S, 2001. "Regulating Private Infrastructure Investment: Optimal Pricing for Access to Essential Facilities," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 167-189, September.
    3. Joshua S. Gans & Stephen P. King, 2004. "Access Holidays and the Timing of Infrastructure Investment," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(248), pages 89-100, March.
    4. Gans, Joshua S & Williams, Philip L, 1999. "Access Regulation and the Timing of Infrastructure Investment," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(229), pages 127-137, June.
    5. King, Stephen P, 1997. "National Competition Policy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 73(222), pages 270-284, September.
    6. Joshua S. Gans & Stephen P. King, 2000. "Options for Electricity Transmission Regulation in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 33(2), pages 145-160.
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