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An Evolutionary Model of Reciprocity

  • Basov, S.

Despite the pervasiveness of reciprocal behavior, it has received little attention in the economic literature. In this paper, I consider an evolutionary model of reciprocity. The main findings of this paper are that evolution can support reciprocal behavior for the fraction of population, which is insensitive to the stakes involved, but is sensitive to the cohesiveness of the relationships. These findings match stylized facts learned from experimental and field studies of reciprocity.

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File URL: http://www.economics.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/wpapers-00-01/812.pdf
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Paper provided by The University of Melbourne in its series Department of Economics - Working Papers Series with number 812.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mlb:wpaper:812
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  1. Schlag, Karl H., 1999. "Which one should I imitate?," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 493-522, May.
  2. D. Fudenberg & C. Harris, 2010. "Evolutionary Dynamics with Aggregate Shocks," Levine's Working Paper Archive 496, David K. Levine.
  3. Schlag, Karl H., 1994. "Why Imitate, and if so, How? Exploring a Model of Social Evolution," Discussion Paper Serie B 296, University of Bonn, Germany.
  4. Karl H. Schlag, . "Why Imitate, and if so, How? A Bounded Rational Approach to Multi- Armed Bandits," ELSE working papers 028, ESRC Centre on Economics Learning and Social Evolution.
  5. Young, H Peyton, 1993. "The Evolution of Conventions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 57-84, January.
  6. Ernst Fehr & Simon Gaechter, . "Fairness and Retaliation: The Economics of Reciprocitys," IEW - Working Papers 040, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  7. Akerlof, George A, 1982. "Labor Contracts as Partial Gift Exchange," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 97(4), pages 543-69, November.
  8. Rajiv Sethi & E.Somanathan, 2002. "Understanding reciprocity," Indian Statistical Institute, Planning Unit, New Delhi Discussion Papers 02-05, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India.
  9. Corradi, Valentina & Sarin, Rajiv, 2000. "Continuous Approximations of Stochastic Evolutionary Game Dynamics," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 163-191, October.
  10. Kandori, M. & Mailath, G.J., 1991. "Learning, Mutation, And Long Run Equilibria In Games," Papers 71, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - John M. Olin Program.
  11. Fehr, Ernst & Gächter, Simon, 2001. "Do Incentive Contracts Crowd Out Voluntary Cooperation?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3017, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Simon P. Anderson & Jacob K. Goeree & Charles A. Holt, 1999. "Stochastic Game Theory: Adjustment to Equilibrium Under Noisy Directional Learning," Virginia Economics Online Papers 327, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
  13. Jonathan Levin, 2000. "Relational Incentive Contracts," Working Papers 01002, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  14. Valentina Corradi & Rajiv Sarin, . "Continuous Approximations of Stochastic Evolutionary Game Dynamics," ELSE working papers 002, ESRC Centre on Economics Learning and Social Evolution.
  15. Sethi, Rajiv & Somanathan, E., 2001. "Preference Evolution and Reciprocity," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 273-297, April.
  16. Herbert Gintis, 2000. "Strong Reciprocity and Human Sociality," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2000-02, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
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