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The influence of academics as insidernongovernmental actors in the Post-Kyoto Protocol Climate Change Negotiations: a matter of timing, network and policyentrepreneurial capabilities

  • Katharina Rietig
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    Nongovernmental actors influence negotiations with insider or outsider strategies. Academics are valued by government delegates for the neutrality and expertise they can provide as policy advisors to facilitate negotiations. This article examines the influence of academics on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations in 2009 and concludes that influence is comparable across issues, but heterogeneous. For academics, influence depends on four qualitatively measurable indicators based on the prerequisite of access to the negotiations and knowledge regarding the current information needs: (1) when in the negotiation cycle academics provide input with the highest influence before the national position is formed, (2) on their personal capabilities like expertise and reputation, (3) on their policy-entrepreneurial activities and (4) their personal network to government delegates and especially the ability to become insiders with access to negotiation text.

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    File URL: http://www.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/WP58_post-kyoto-protocol-climate-change.pdf
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    Paper provided by Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment in its series GRI Working Papers with number 58.

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    Date of creation: Sep 2011
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    Handle: RePEc:lsg:lsgwps:wp58
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    1. Haas, Peter M., 1992. "Introduction: epistemic communities and international policy coordination," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(01), pages 1-35, December.
    2. Adler, Emanuel & Haas, Peter M., 1992. "Conclusion: epistemic communities, world order, and the creation of a reflective research program," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(01), pages 367-390, December.
    3. Putnam, Robert D., 1988. "Diplomacy and domestic politics: the logic of two-level games," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(03), pages 427-460, June.
    4. Robert Falkner & Hannes Stephan & John Vogler, 2010. "International climate policy after Copenhagen: towards a ‘building blocks’ approach," GRI Working Papers 21, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    5. Michele M. Betsill & Elisabeth Corell, 2001. "NGO Influence in International Environmental Negotiations: A Framework for Analysis," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 1(4), pages 65-85, November.
    6. Lars H. Gulbrandsen & Steinar Andresen, 2004. "NGO Influence in the Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol: Compliance, Flexibility Mechanisms, and Sinks," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 4(4), pages 54-75, November.
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