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Toward True Health Care Reform: More Care, Less Insurance

Listed author(s):
  • Marshall Auerback
  • L. Randall Wray

The United States has the most expensive health care system in the world, yet its system produces inferior outcomes relative to those in other countries. This brief examines the health care reform debate and argues that the basic structure of the health care system is unlikely to change, because “reform” measures actually promote the status quo. The authors believe that the fundamental problem facing the U.S. health care system is the unhealthy lifestyle of many Americans. They prefer to see a reduced role for private insurers and an increased role for government funding, along with greater public discussion of environmental and lifestyle factors. A Medicare buy-in (“public option”) for people under 65 would provide more cost control (by competing with private insurance), help to solve the problem of treatment denial based on preexisting conditions, expand the risk pool of patients, and enhance the global competitiveness of U.S. corporations—thus bringing the U.S. health care system closer to the “ideal” low-cost, universal (single-payer) insurance plan.

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File URL: http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/ppb_110.pdf
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Paper provided by Levy Economics Institute in its series Economics Public Policy Brief Archive with number ppb_110.

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Date of creation: Jan 2010
Handle: RePEc:lev:levppb:ppb_110
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.levyinstitute.org

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. L. Randall Wray, 2008. "The Commodities Market Bubble: Money Manager Capitalism and the Financialization of Commodities," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_96, Levy Economics Institute.
  2. Dimitri B. Papadimitriou & L. Randall Wray, "undated". "Does Social Security Need Saving? Providing for Retirees throughout the Twenty-first Century," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_55, Levy Economics Institute.
  3. Yeva Nersisyan & L. Randall Wray, 2010. "The Trouble with Pensions: Toward an Alternative Public Policy to Support Retirement," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_109, Levy Economics Institute.
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