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Endgame for the Euro? Without Major Restructuring, the Eurozone is Doomed


  • Dimitri B. Papadimitriou
  • L. Randall Wray
  • Yeva Nersisyan


Critics argue that the current crisis has exposed the profligacy of the Greek government and its citizens, who are stubbornly fighting proposed social spending cuts and refusing to live within their means. Yet Greece has one of the lowest per capita incomes in the European Union (EU), and its social safety net is modest compared to the rest of Europe. Since implementing its austerity program in January, it has reduced its budget deficit by 40 percent, largely through spending cuts. But slower growth is causing revenues to come in below targets, and fuel-tax increases have contributed to growing inflation. As the larger troubled economies like Spain and Italy also adopt austerity measures, the entire continent could find government revenues collapsing. No rescue plan can address the central problem: that countries with very different economies are yoked to the same currency. Lacking a sovereign currency and unable to devalue their way out of trouble, they are left with few viable options—and voters in Germany and France will soon tire of paying the bill. A more far-reaching solution is needed.

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  • Dimitri B. Papadimitriou & L. Randall Wray & Yeva Nersisyan, 2010. "Endgame for the Euro? Without Major Restructuring, the Eurozone is Doomed," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_113, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:levppb:ppb_113

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Marc-Andre Pigeon & L. Randall Wray, 1999. "Demand Constraints and Economic Growth," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_269, Levy Economics Institute.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michalis Nikiforos & Dimitri B. Papadimitriou & Gennaro Zezza, 2015. "The Greek Public Debt Problem," Economics Policy Note Archive 15-2, Levy Economics Institute.
    2. Greg Hannsgen & Dimitri B. Papadimitriou, 2010. "The Central Bank 'Printing Press': Boon or Bane? Remedies for High Unemployment and Fears of Fiscal Crisis," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_640, Levy Economics Institute.
    3. Giorgos Argitis & Stella Michopoulou, 2013. "Studies in Financial Systems No 4 Financialization and the Greek Financial System," FESSUD studies fstudy04, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.

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