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Mortgages and Financial Expectations: A Household Level Analysis

Author

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  • Sarah Brown

    ()

  • Gaia Garino

    ()

  • Karl Taylor

    ()

Abstract

We contribute to the literature on household mortgage debt by exploring one particular influence on mortgage debt at the household level, namely the financial expectations of the individuals within the household. Our theoretical model predicts a positive association between the quantity of mortgage debt and optimistic financial expectations. Our empirical findings based on household level data provide convincing support for our theoretical priors in that optimistic financial expectations are positively associated with the level of outstanding mortgage debt.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Brown & Gaia Garino & Karl Taylor, 2005. "Mortgages and Financial Expectations: A Household Level Analysis," Discussion Papers in Economics 05/9, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Dec 2006.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:05/9
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    File URL: http://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/RePEc/lec/leecon/dp05-9.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Brown & Andy Dickerson & Jolian McHardy & Karl Taylor, 2010. "Gambling and the use of credit: an individual and household level analysis," Working Papers 2010005, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2010.
    2. Brown, Sarah & Taylor, Karl, 2014. "Household finances and the ‘Big Five’ personality traits," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 197-212.
    3. Brown, Sarah & Ortiz-Nuñez, Aurora & Taylor, Karl, 2011. "What will I be when I grow up? An analysis of childhood expectations and career outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 493-506, June.
    4. Sarah Brown & Karl Taylor, "undated". "Reservation Wages, Expected wages and the duration of Unemployment: evidence from British Panel data," Working Papers 2009001, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    5. Martie Gillen & Hyungsoo Kim, 2014. "Older Adults’ Receipt of Financial Help: Does Personality Matter?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 178-189, June.
    6. Sarah Brown & Karl Taylor, 2008. "Expectations, Reservation Wages And Employment: Evidence From British Panel Data," Working Papers 2008007, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised May 2008.
    7. Weiou Wu & Apostolos Fasianos & Stephen Kinsella, 2015. "Differences in Borrowing Behaviour between Core and Peripheral Economies — Economic Environment versus Financial Perceptions," Working Papers 201516, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    8. Sarah Brown & Andrew Dickerson & Jolian McHardy & Karl Taylor, 2012. "Gambling and credit: an individual and household level analysis for the UK," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(35), pages 4639-4650, December.
    9. Mary Eschelbach Hansen & Julie Routzahn, 2014. "Gender Differences in Attitudes Toward Debt and Financial Position: The Impact of the Great Recession," Working Papers 2014-10, American University, Department of Economics.
    10. Brown, Sarah & Ghosh, Pulak & Su, Li & Taylor, Karl, 2015. "Modelling household finances: A Bayesian approach to a multivariate two-part model," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 190-207.
    11. Li Su & Sarah Brown & Pulak Ghosh & Karl Taylor, 2012. "Modelling Household Debt and Financial Assets: A Bayesian Approach to a Bivariate Two-Part Model," Working Papers 2012009, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    12. repec:eee:asieco:v:56:y:2018:i:c:p:1-23 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Sarah Brown & Karl Taylor, 2012. "Expectations and the Saving Behaviour of Children: Analysis of the U.S. Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Working Papers 2012015, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Expectations; Housing Tenure; Inter-temporal Consumption; Mortgage Debt;

    JEL classification:

    • D18 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Protection
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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