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Taylor rules, fear of floating and the role of the exchange rate in monetary policy: a case of observational equivalence

Author

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  • Juan Paez-Farrell

    () (School of Business and Economics, Loughborough University, UK)

Abstract

This paper considers the role of the exchange rate in monetary policy rules. It argues that much recent research aimed at determining the extent of concern for exchange rate stabilisation on the part of central banks is potentially flawed. If policy makers are subject to fear of floating – whereby they aim to stabilise exchange rates but without revealing this to the public – current estimated models cannot may provide insufficient information to determine policy objectives. In effect, several structural models may yield observationally equivalent interest rate rules. The paper uses two small open economy models to highlight this issue.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Paez-Farrell, 2012. "Taylor rules, fear of floating and the role of the exchange rate in monetary policy: a case of observational equivalence," Discussion Paper Series 2012_07, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Jun 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:lbo:lbowps:2012_07
    as

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    File URL: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/sbe/RePEc/lbo/lbowps/JPF_WP2012_07.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McCallum, Bennett T & Nelson, Edward, 2000. "Monetary Policy for an Open Economy: An Alternative Framework with Optimizing Agents and Sticky Prices," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 74-91, Winter.
    2. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408.
    3. Timothy Kam & Kirdan Lees & Philip Liu, 2009. "Uncovering the Hit List for Small Inflation Targeters: A Bayesian Structural Analysis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(4), pages 583-618, June.
    4. Richard Dennis & Kai Leitemo & Ulf Soderstrom, 2006. "Monetary Policy in a Small Open Economy with a Preference for Robustness," Working Papers 316, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    5. Alejandro Justiniano & Bruce Preston, 2010. "Monetary policy and uncertainty in an empirical small open-economy model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 93-128.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Small open economies; monetary policy; exchange rates; Taylor rule; fear of floating.;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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