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The Effects of Internet Book Piracy: Case of Comics

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  • Tatsuo Tanaka

    (Faculty of Economics, Keio University)

Abstract

In this study, the effects of internet book piracy in the case of the Japanese comic book market were examined using direct measurement of product level piracy ratio and a massive deletion project as a natural experiment. Total effect of the piracy is negative to the legitimate sales, but panel regression and difference-in-difference analysis consistently indicated that the effect of piracy is heterogeneous: piracy decreased the legitimate sales of ongoing comics, whereas increased the legitimate sales of completed comics. The latter result is interpreted as follows: piracy reminds consumers of past comics and stimulates sales in that market.

Suggested Citation

  • Tatsuo Tanaka, 2019. "The Effects of Internet Book Piracy: Case of Comics," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2019-016, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
  • Handle: RePEc:keo:dpaper:2019-016
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    File URL: http://ies.keio.ac.jp/upload/pdf/en/DP2019-016.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    copyright; comic; piracy; Internet; DID;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media
    • M3 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising
    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital

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