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Teleworking as a mode of working for women in Sri Lanka: Concept, challenges and prospects

Author

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  • Dissanayake, Kumudinei

Abstract

Labor force participation of women in Sri Lanka has been continuously low despite their remarkable educational achievements when compared to men. Teleworking mode facilitates flexibility at work and work-family balance. However, developing countries encounter numerous challenges in making the teleworking mode a reality. This paper examines the possibilities of introducing teleworking mode for women in Sri Lanka. It understands that the government, technological institutions, work organizations, training institutions, outsourcing companies, career-counseling centers, teleworkers themselves and prospective teleworker associations have major roles to play in this endeavor.

Suggested Citation

  • Dissanayake, Kumudinei, 2017. "Teleworking as a mode of working for women in Sri Lanka: Concept, challenges and prospects," IDE Discussion Papers 680, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper680
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    File URL: https://ir.ide.go.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=49750&item_no=1&attribute_id=22&file_no=1
    File Function: First version, 2017
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ghani, Ejaz & Kerr, William & O'Connell, Stephen, 2013. "Promoting Women’s Economic Participation in India," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 107, pages 1-6, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor force participation; Women; Teleworking; Challenges; Prospects; Sri Lanka; A model; Labor market; Female labor;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M54 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Management
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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