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The Effects of Cooperation: A Structural Model of Siblings' Caregiving Interactions

Author

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  • Knoef, Marike

    () (Leiden University)

  • Kooreman, Peter

    () (Tilburg University)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the decision making process of adult children to provide informal care to their parents. First, we develop a structural model to explain the amount of time that only children (without siblings) spend on providing care, taking into account opportunity costs in terms of time and money. The model is estimated using two datasets from 12 European countries and reveals the preferences of adult children for consumption, leisure and informal care. Although we assume that differences in behavior between children with and without siblings are due to dissimilar constraints only, by using only children we do not have to make assumptions about interactions between siblings in the structural model. In the presence of siblings, their choices also play a role in the caregiving decision. A central question is whether siblings make cooperative or noncooperative decisions. The second part of this paper aims to establish whether interactions between siblings are cooperative or noncooperative, by comparing predicted cooperative and noncooperative outcomes with observed outcomes. We use the structural parameter estimates from the first part of the paper and model the noncooperative outcomes using a Quantal Response Equilibrium. The results suggest that the nature of the interactions between siblings has a strong effect on the division of informal care between siblings. For almost three quarters of the families the noncooperative model has a better fit than the cooperative model. When the noncooperative families can be pushed into their cooperative outcome, their parents would on average receive 50% more informal care per week from their children, but this would reduce full-time labor supply by 5.7%-points and increase part-time labor supply by 6.7%.

Suggested Citation

  • Knoef, Marike & Kooreman, Peter, 2011. "The Effects of Cooperation: A Structural Model of Siblings' Caregiving Interactions," IZA Discussion Papers 5733, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5733
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Van Houtven, Courtney Harold & Norton, Edward C., 2004. "Informal care and health care use of older adults," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1159-1180, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2012. "Externality and Strategic Interaction in the Location Choice of Siblings under Altruism toward Parents," Working Papers 201201, ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales.
    2. Katrine Løken & Kjell Lommerud & Shelly Lundberg, 2013. "Your Place or Mine? On the Residence Choice of Young Couples in Norway," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(1), pages 285-310, February.
    3. Román Andrés Zárate, 2012. "Peer Effects, Cooperation and Competition in Human Capital Formation," Documentos CEDE 009795, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE.
    4. Sugawara, Shinya & Nakamura, Jiro, 2014. "Can formal elderly care stimulate female labor supply? The Japanese experience," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 98-115.
    5. Pieter Bakx & Claudine de Meijer & Frederik Schut & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2015. "Going Formal or Informal, Who Cares? The Influence of Public Long‐Term Care Insurance," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(6), pages 631-643, June.
    6. Meghan M. Skira, 2015. "Dynamic Wage And Employment Effects Of Elder Parent Care," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 63-93, February.
    7. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Cristina Vilaplana Prieto, 2013. "Informal Care and intergenerational transfers in European Countries," Working Papers 2013-25, FEDEA.
    8. Shinya Sugawara & Jiro Nakamura, 2013. "Is Elderly Care Socialized in Japan? Analyzing the Effects of the 2006 Amendment to the LTCI on the Female Labor Supply," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-888, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    9. Shiko Maruyama & Meliyanni Johar, 2017. "Do siblings free‐ride in “being there” for parents?," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 8(1), pages 277-316, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    time allocation; (non)cooperation; structural modelling;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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