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Mapping Experiences and Research about Unaccompanied Refugee Minors in Sweden and Other Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Celikaksoy, Aycan

    (SOFI, Stockholm University)

  • Wadensjö, Eskil

    (Stockholm University)

Abstract

Many unaccompanied children have applied for asylum during the last few years, especially in 2015. These children face special challenges and risk being exploited due to their age and legal status. In this paper we survey research and otherwise documented experiences regarding this group of children. The main focus is on Sweden, the European country that has received most unaccompanied children but we also report on the experiences of other Nordic countries, a list of other EU member states, as well as USA and Turkey. We also try to summarize the main lessons for a policy to assist these children to integrate in the countries they have arrived to.

Suggested Citation

  • Celikaksoy, Aycan & Wadensjö, Eskil, 2016. "Mapping Experiences and Research about Unaccompanied Refugee Minors in Sweden and Other Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 10143, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10143
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bhabha, Jacqueline, 2004. "Seeking Asylum Alone: Treatment of Separated and Trafficked Children in Need of Refugee Protection," Working Paper Series rwp04-014, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Wade, Jim, 2011. "Preparation and transition planning for unaccompanied asylum-seeking and refugee young people: A review of evidence in England," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 2424-2430.
    3. Bean, Tammy M. & Eurelings-Bontekoe, Elisabeth & Spinhoven, Philip, 2007. "Course and predictors of mental health of unaccompanied refugee minors in the Netherlands: One year follow-up," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(6), pages 1204-1215, March.
    4. Amelie F. Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann (ed.), 2013. "International Handbook on the Economics of Migration," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 4026.
    5. Merja Paksuniemi, 2015. "Finnish refugee children’s experiences of Swedish refugee camps during the Second World War," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 12(1), pages 28-37, January.
    6. Summerfield, Derek, 1999. "A critique of seven assumptions behind psychological trauma programmes in war-affected areas," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 48(10), pages 1449-1462, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    unaccompanied minors; separated refugee children; migration; reception policies; integration policies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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