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Posiadanie w³asnego mieszkania a rodzicielstwo w Polsce

Author

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  • Anna Matysiak

    (Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics)

Abstract

Posiadanie w³asnego mieszkania to wed³ug Hobcraft i Kiernan (1995) jeden z warunków realizacji decyzji o zostaniu rodzicem w krajach rozwiniêtych. Znaczenie tego czynnika dla decyzji o rodzicielstwie nie by³o jak dotychczas przedmiotem badañ w Polsce. Niniejsze opracowanie ma na celu czêœciowe wype³nienie tej luki poprzez przeprowadzenie badania zwi¹zku pomiêdzy posiadaniem w³asnego mieszkania a przejœciem do rodzicielstwa przez Polki urodzone w latach 1971-1981. Zagadnienie to jest wa¿ne ze wzglêdu na d³ugotrwa³y spadek liczby mieszkañ oddawanych do u¿ytku i znacz¹cy wzrost cen mieszkañ, jaki zaobserwowano w Polsce po 1989 r. Wyniki przeprowadzonych analiz wskazuj¹ na istnienie silnej dodatniej zale¿noœci pomiêdzy zamieszkiwaniem we w³asnym mieszkaniu a rodzicielstwem. Analizy pog³êbione pokazuj¹, ¿e jest to w du¿ym stopniu efekt warunkowania realizacji wczeœniej podjêtej decyzji o dziecku przeprowadzk¹ do w³asnego mieszkania. Co wa¿ne, wynajmowanie mieszkania jest znacznie mniej atrakcyjn¹ opcj¹ dla osób planuj¹cych dziecko, porównywaln¹ ze zamieszkiwaniem u rodziców. Otrzymane wyniki te s¹ zgodne z wynikami badañ empirycznych prowadzonych w innych krajach rozwiniêtych i sugeruj¹, ¿e trudnoœci z pozyskaniem w³asnego mieszkania prowadz¹ do opóŸniania realizacji decyzji o zostaniu rodzicem.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Matysiak, 2011. "Posiadanie w³asnego mieszkania a rodzicielstwo w Polsce," Working Papers 46, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isd:wpaper:46
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hill Kulu & Andres Vikat, 2007. "Fertility differences by housing type: an effect of housing conditions or of selective moves?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2007-014, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Tomas Frejka, 2008. "Overview Chapter 5: Determinants of family formation and childbearing during the societal transition in Central and Eastern Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(7), pages 139-170.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Baranowska-Rataj, 2014. "What Would Your Parents Say? The Impact of Cohabitation Among Young People on Their Relationships with Their Parents," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(6), pages 1313-1332, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    p³odnoœæ; rodzicielstwo; mieszkania; rynek mieszkaniowy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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