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Inflación y flexibilidad del mercado laboral: La rueda que chilla es la que se engrasa

  • Ana Maria Loboguerrero
  • Ugo Panizza

(Disponible en idioma inglés únicamente) La inflación puede engrasar las ruedas del mercado laboral, al disminuir la rigidez del ajuste salarial, pero también puede aumentar la incertidumbre y tener un efecto negativo de arena. En este trabajo se analiza el efecto de flexibilización que produce la inflación, y se analiza si la interacción entre la inflación y la regulación del mercado laboral inciden en la forma en que el empleo responde a las variaciones de la producción. Los resultados demuestran que en países industriales con mercados laborales altamente regulados, el efecto de flexibilización que produce la inflación domina al efecto de arena. En el caso de los países en desarrollo, la inflación rara vez tiene un efecto significativo en la normativa de los mercados laborales, lo que podría deberse a la presencia de un sector informal considerable y a una aplicación de jure de la normativa de los mercados laborales limitada.

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4348.

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Date of creation: Aug 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4348
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