IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Supply Responses in the Economies of the Former Soviet Union

  • Paul Hare
  • Alan Bevan
  • Jon Stern
  • Saul Estrin

Output decline has been a feature of the transition economies in the initial post-communist period, including in those countries that belonged to the former Soviet Union. However, explanations for the decline and its persistence have not been easy to find, and mostly they have focussed upon domestic factors in each economy. The theory of disorganization introduced the idea that disrupted supply chains following the demise of central planning might have a role in the explanation of output decline. This paper extends that idea to distinguish between supply from domestic sources, and supply from abroad. Using data for Ukraine and Kazakhstan, the paper finds - contrary to expectation - that the disruption of supplies from hard currency markets was more significant in explaining output decline in these countries than disruption of supplies from CIS partners. This suggests that institutional weaknesses in the areas of international banking, trade insurance, and the like, have been very important factors.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University in its series CERT Discussion Papers with number 0009.

in new window

Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hwe:certdp:0009
Contact details of provider: Postal: Edinburgh EH14 4AS
Phone: +44(0)131 451 3497
Fax: +44(0)131 451 3497
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. J. M. C. Rollo & J. Stern, 1992. "Growth and Trade Prospects for Central and Eastern Europe," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(5), pages 645-668, 09.
  2. Hamilton, C.B. & Winters, L.A., 1992. "Opening Up International Trade in Eastern Europe," Papers 511, Stockholm - International Economic Studies.
  3. Blanchard, Olivier & Kremer, Michael R., 1997. "Disorganization," Scholarly Articles 3659691, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Dani Rodrik, 1994. "Foreign Trade in Eastern Europe's Transition: Early Results," NBER Chapters, in: The Transition in Eastern Europe, Volume 2: Restructuring, pages 319-356 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Dani Rodrik, 1992. "Making Sense of the Soviet Trade Shock in Eastern Europe: A Framework and Some Estimates," NBER Working Papers 4112, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. repec:tpr:qjecon:v:112:y:1997:i:4:p:1091-1126 is not listed on IDEAS
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hwe:certdp:0009. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Colin Miller)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.