IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/huj/dispap/dp634.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Representation of constitutions under incomplete information

Author

Listed:
  • Bezalel Peleg
  • Shmuel Zamir

Abstract

We model constitutions by effectivity functions. We assume that the constitution is common knowledge among the members of the society. However, the preferences of the citizen are private information. We investigate whether there exist decision schemes (i. e., functions that map profiles of (dichotomous) preferences on the set of outcomes to lotteries on the set of social states), with the following properties: i) The distribution of power induced by the decision scheme is identical to the effectivity function under consideration; and ii) the (incomplete information) game associated with the decision scheme has a Bayesian Nash equilibrium in pure strategies. If the effectivity function is monotonic and superadditive, then we find a class of decision schemes with the foregoing properties. When applied to n-person games in strategic form, a decision scheme d is a mapping from profiles of (dichotomous) preferences on the set of pure strategy vectors to probability distributions over outcomes (or equivalently, over pure strategy vectors). We prove that for any feasible and individually rational payoff vector of a strategic game, there exists a decision scheme that yields that payoff vector as a (pure) Nash equilibrium payoff in the game induced by the strategic game and the decision scheme. This can be viewed as a kind of purification result.

Suggested Citation

  • Bezalel Peleg & Shmuel Zamir, 2013. "Representation of constitutions under incomplete information," Discussion Paper Series dp634, The Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
  • Handle: RePEc:huj:dispap:dp634
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ratio.huji.ac.il/sites/default/files/publications/dp634.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00199-014-0816-0
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peleg, Bezalel & Peters, Hans & Storcken, Ton, 2002. "Nash consistent representation of constitutions: a reaction to the Gibbard paradox," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 267-287, March.
    2. Gibbard, Allan, 1974. "A Pareto-consistent libertarian claim," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 388-410, April.
    3. Hans Keiding & Bezalel Peleg, 2006. "Binary effectivity rules," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 10(3), pages 167-181, December.
    4. Bezalel Peleg & Hans Peters, 2010. "Strategic Social Choice," Studies in Choice and Welfare, Springer, number 978-3-642-13875-1, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bezalel Peleg & Ron Holzman, 2017. "Representations of Political Power Structures by Strategically Stable Game Forms: A Survey," Games, MDPI, vol. 8(4), pages 1-17, October.
    2. Hans Gersbach & Stephan Imhof & Oriol Tejada, 2021. "Channeling the final say in politics: a simple mechanism," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 71(1), pages 151-183, February.
    3. Hans Peters & Marc Schröder & Dries Vermeulen, 2015. "On existence of ex post Nash consistent representation for effectivity functions," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 45(2), pages 287-307, September.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Bezalel Peleg & Ron Holzman, 2017. "Representations of Political Power Structures by Strategically Stable Game Forms: A Survey," Games, MDPI, vol. 8(4), pages 1-17, October.
    2. Caroline Berden & Hans Peters, 2006. "On the Effect of Risk Aversion in Bimatrix Games," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 60(4), pages 359-370, June.
    3. Peleg, Bezalel & Peters, Hans, 2009. "Nash consistent representation of effectivity functions through lottery models," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 503-515, March.
    4. Peters, H.J.M. & Schröder, M.J.W. & Vermeulen, A.J., 2013. "Ex post Nash consistent representation of effectivity functions," Research Memorandum 049, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
    5. Agnieszka Rusinowska, 2013. "Bezalel Peleg and Hans Peters: Strategic Social Choice. Stable Representations of Constitutions, Studies in choice and welfare, Springer, 2010, 154 pp," Post-Print hal-00666816, HAL.
    6. Agnieszka Rusinowska, 2013. "Bezalel Peleg and Hans Peters: Strategic social choice. Stable representations of constitutions," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 40(2), pages 631-634, February.
    7. Agnieszka Rusinowska, 2013. "Book review on "Bezalel Peleg and Hans Peters: Strategic Social Choice. Stable Representations of Constitutions", Studies in choice and welfare, Springer, 2010, 154 pp," PSE-Ecole d'économie de Paris (Postprint) hal-00666816, HAL.
    8. Hans Peters & Marc Schröder & Dries Vermeulen, 2015. "On existence of ex post Nash consistent representation for effectivity functions," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 45(2), pages 287-307, September.
    9. Christian Seidl, 1990. "On the impossibility of a generalization of the libertarian resolution of the liberal paradox," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 71-88, February.
    10. Bezalel Peleg, 2002. "Complete Characterization of Acceptable Game Forms by Effectivity Functions," Discussion Paper Series dp283, The Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
    11. Roy Gardner, 1980. "The strategic inconsistency of Paretian liberalism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 241-252, January.
    12. Alessandro Morselli, 2021. "Individual decisions and collective choices in the history of economic thought," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 3, pages 77-96,97-11.
    13. Roy Gardner, 1983. "Variation of the electorate: Veto and purge," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 237-247, January.
    14. Peleg, Bezalel & Peters, Hans, 2017. "Choosing k from m: Feasible elimination procedures reconsidered," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 254-261.
    15. Ben McQuillin & Robert Sugden, 2011. "The representation of alienable and inalienable rights: games in transition function form," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 37(4), pages 683-706, October.
    16. Stanley Reiter, 2001. "Interdependent Preferences and Groups of Agents," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 3(1), pages 27-67, January.
    17. Gonzalez, Stéphane & Lardon, Aymeric, 2021. "Axiomatic foundations of the core for games in effectiveness form," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 28-38.
    18. Piacquadio Paolo G. & Di Bartolomeo Giovanni & Acocella Nicola, 2009. "A simple framework for investigating the properties of policy games," wp.comunite 0059, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
    19. Keiding, Hans & Peleg, Bezalel, 2006. "On the continuity of representations of effectivity functions," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(7-8), pages 827-842, November.
    20. Christian Seidl, 1986. "The impossibility of nondictatorial tolerance," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 211-225, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium
    • C70 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - General
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:huj:dispap:dp634. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/crihuil.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Michael Simkin (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/crihuil.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.