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In-Work Benefits in Search Equilibrium

We study the general equilibrium effects of in-work beneifts in a search framework. Introducing in-work benefits reduces equilibrium unemployment, moderate wages, and boost participation and search. Total employment increases as a result. Considering in-work benefits in a general equilibrium setting reveals that employment increases mainly though the impact on job creation. This is in contrast to what is usually stressed, namely that employment increases because individuals are provided with incentives to take a job.

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File URL: http://www2.ne.su.se/paper/wp06_12.pdf
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Paper provided by Stockholm University, Department of Economics in its series Research Papers in Economics with number 2006:12.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: 21 Dec 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:sunrpe:2006_0012
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Stockholm, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
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Fax: +46 8 16 14 25
Web page: http://www.ne.su.se/
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  1. Bruce D. Meyer & Dan T. Rosenbaum, 2001. "Welfare, The Earned Income Tax Credit, And The Labor Supply Of Single Mothers," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(3), pages 1063-1114, August.
  2. Boone, J. & Bovenberg, A.L., 2002. "The Optimal Taxation of UnskilIed Labor with Job Search and Social Assistance," Discussion Paper 2002-57, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  3. Jeremy Lise & Shannon Seitz & Jeffrey Smith, 2004. "Equilibrium Policy Experiments and the Evaluation of Social Programs," NBER Working Papers 10283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Immervoll, Herwig & Kleven, Henrik & Kreiner, Claus Thustrup & Saez, Emmanuel, 2004. "Welfare Reform in European Countries: A Micro-Simulation Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 4324, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Schnabel, Reinhold & Gürtzgen, Nicole & Boeters, Stefan, 2003. "Reforming Social Welfare in Germany: An Applied General Equilibrium Analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-70, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  6. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-140889 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Michalopoulos, Charles & Robins, Philip K. & Card, David, 2005. "When financial work incentives pay for themselves: evidence from a randomized social experiment for welfare recipients," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 5-29, January.
  8. Eissa, Nada & Liebman, Jeffrey B, 1996. "Labor Supply Response to the Earned Income Tax Credit," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 111(2), pages 605-37, May.
  9. Nada Eissa & Hilary W. Hoynes, 2006. "Behavioral Responses to Taxes: Lessons from the EITC and Labor Supply," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 20, pages 73-110 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Emmanuel Saez, 2000. "Optimal Income Transfer Programs: Intensive Versus Extensive Labor Supply Responses," NBER Working Papers 7708, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Boone, J. & Bovenberg, A.L., 2006. "Optimal welfare and in-work benefits with search unemployment and observable abilities," Other publications TiSEM 699c7d24-2a40-4eed-b03e-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  12. Hanming Fang & Michael P. Keane, 2004. "Assessing the Impact of Welfare Reform on Single Mothers," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 35(1), pages 1-116.
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