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A model for supply of informal care to elderly parents

  • Fevang, Elisabeth

    (Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research)

  • Kverndokk, Snorre

    ()

    (Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research)

  • Røed, Knut

    (Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research)

This paper presents a model of informal care to parents. We assume that the child participates in the labour market and gains in utility from consumption and leisure. In addition it has altruistic motivation to give informal care to its elderly parent. We show how the labour income, labour supply and informal caregiving are affected by exogenous factors such as the education level, wage rate, other supply of care, travel distance and inheritance.

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File URL: http://www.hero.uio.no/publicat/2008/2008_12.pdf
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Paper provided by Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme in its series HERO On line Working Paper Series with number 2008:12.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 02 Jun 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:oslohe:2008_012
Contact details of provider: Postal: HERO / Institute of Health Management and Health Economics P.O. Box 1089 Blindern, N-0317 Oslo, Norway
Phone: 2307 5309
Fax: 2307 5310
Web page: http://www.hero.uio.no/eng.html
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  1. Kuhn, Michael & Nuscheler, Robert, 2011. "Optimal public provision of nursing homes and the role of information," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 795-810, July.
  2. Karine Nyborg & Mari Rege, 2001. "Does Public Policy Crowd Out Private Contributions to Public Goods?," Discussion Papers 300, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  3. Konrad, K.A. & Junemund, H. & Lommerud, K.E. & Robledo, J.R., 2000. "Geography of the Family," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 2499, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
  4. Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2005. "O Brother, Where Art Thou? The Effects of Having a Sibling on Geographic Mobility and Labor Market Outcomes," CRIEFF Discussion Papers 0513, Centre for Research into Industry, Enterprise, Finance and the Firm.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-18 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Maxim Engers & Steven Stern, 2002. "Long-Term Care and Family Bargaining," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 73-114, February.
  7. Michael, Robert T, 1973. "Education in Nonmarket Production," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 306-27, Part I, M.
  8. Cogan, John F, 1981. "Fixed Costs and Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 945-63, June.
  9. Lisa Callegaro & Giacomo Pasini, 2007. "Social interaction effects in an inter-generational model of informal care giving," Working Papers 2007_10, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
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