IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/luwick/2014_002.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Institutional Quality, Trust and Stock Market Participation: Learning to Forget

Author

Listed:
  • Asgharian, Hossein

    (Knut Wicksell Centre for Financial Studies, Lund University)

  • Liu, Lu

    (Knut Wicksell Centre for Financial Studies, Lund University)

  • Lundtofte, Frederik

    () (Knut Wicksell Centre for Financial Studies, Lund University)

Abstract

This paper explores the relation between institutional quality, trust and stock market participation. In our theoretical motivation, agents update their beliefs in a Bayesian manner based on their historical observations on frauds and they choose to invest in the stock market if their subjective probability of fraud is sufficiently low. In accordance with this theoretical motivation, we develop an empirical model, which tests the hypothesis that higher institutional quality is likely to lead to a higher level of trust, together with the hypothesis that when the level of trust is sufficiently high, agents choose to invest in the stock market. We use a large sample of European (SHARE survey) data on households residing in fourteen European countries that have a large variation in institutional quality. We find that institutional quality has a significant effect on trust and that trust (particularly the part that is explained by institutional quality) in turn significantly affects stock market participation. Moreover, our model takes into account the learning process of immigrants, who experience a dramatic change in institutional quality. We find that the probability that an immigrant participates in the stock market increases both with the institutional quality of the country of residence and that of the country of origin. However, on average, the former is more influential than the latter. We also find that immigrants with a higher level of education adapt their level of trust faster to the institutional environment of the country of residence than those with a lower level of education. The impact of the institutional quality of the immigrants’ country of residence on stock market participation, relative to that of their country of origin, tends to increase with education.

Suggested Citation

  • Asgharian, Hossein & Liu, Lu & Lundtofte, Frederik, 2014. "Institutional Quality, Trust and Stock Market Participation: Learning to Forget," Knut Wicksell Working Paper Series 2014/2, Lund University, Knut Wicksell Centre for Financial Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:luwick:2014_002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.lusem.lu.se/media/kwc/working-papers/2014/kwc-wp-2014-2.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jeremy Verlinda, 2006. "A comparison of two common approaches for estimating marginal effects in binary choice models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 77-80.
    2. Luigi Guiso & Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales, 2008. "Trusting the Stock Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(6), pages 2557-2600, December.
    3. Dimitris Christelis & Dimitris Georgarakos & Michael Haliassos, 2013. "Differences in Portfolios across Countries: Economic Environment versus Household Characteristics," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(1), pages 220-236, March.
    4. Mariassunta Giannetti & Tracy Yue Wang, 2016. "Corporate Scandals and Household Stock Market Participation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(6), pages 2591-2636, December.
    5. H. Henry Cao & Tan Wang & Harold H. Zhang, 2005. "Model Uncertainty, Limited Market Participation, and Asset Prices," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 18(4), pages 1219-1251.
    6. Haliassos, Michalis & Jansson, Thomas & Karabulut, Yigitcan, 2014. "Incompatible European partners? Cultural predispositions and household financial behavior," SAFE Working Paper Series 58, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    7. Harrison Hong & Jeffrey D. Kubik & Jeremy C. Stein, 2004. "Social Interaction and Stock-Market Participation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(1), pages 137-163, February.
    8. Dimitris Georgarakos & Giacomo Pasini, 2011. "Trust, Sociability, and Stock Market Participation," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 15(4), pages 693-725.
    9. Larry G. Epstein & Martin Schneider, 2007. "Learning Under Ambiguity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(4), pages 1275-1303.
    10. Iris Bohnet & Steffen Huck, 2004. "Repetition and Reputation: Implications for Trust and Trustworthiness When Institutions Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 362-366, May.
    11. Goffe, William L. & Ferrier, Gary D. & Rogers, John, 1994. "Global optimization of statistical functions with simulated annealing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 65-99.
    12. Hakansson, Nils H, 1971. "On Optimal Myopic Portfolio Policies, With and Without Serial Correlation of Yields," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(3), pages 324-334, July.
    13. Williamson, Stephen D., 1994. "Liquidity and market participation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(3-4), pages 629-670.
    14. Ang, Andrew & Bekaert, Geert & Liu, Jun, 2005. "Why stocks may disappoint," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 471-508, June.
    15. Dow, James & Werlang, Sergio Ribeiro da Costa, 1992. "Uncertainty Aversion, Risk Aversion, and the Optimal Choice of Portfolio," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(1), pages 197-204, January.
    16. Jeffrey R. Brown & Zoran Ivkovic & Paul A. Smith & Scott Weisbenner, 2008. "Neighbors Matter: Causal Community Effects and Stock Market Participation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(3), pages 1509-1531, June.
    17. Francisco J. Gomes, 2005. "Portfolio Choice and Trading Volume with Loss-Averse Investors," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(2), pages 675-706, March.
    18. Allen, Franklin & Gale, Douglas, 1994. "Limited Market Participation and Volatility of Asset Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 933-955, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sarah El Joueidi, 2017. "Self-Regulation and Stock Listing Decision of Banks," CREA Discussion Paper Series 17-05, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    institutional quality; learning; trust; limited participation puzzle;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:luwick:2014_002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Niclas Andrén) or (Frederik Lundtofte). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/kwcluse.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.