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Well-Informed Choices? Effects of Information Interventions in Primary Care on Care Quality

Author

Listed:
  • Anell, Anders

    (Department of Business Administration, Lund University)

  • Dietrichson, Jens

    (VIVE - The Danish Center for Social Science Research)

  • Ellegård, Lina Maria

    (Department of Economics, Lund University)

  • Kjellsson, Gustav

    (Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg)

Abstract

Market frictions, such as imperfect information or hassle costs, may reduce benefits from market incentives in healthcare settings. We use data from two randomised policy interventions in a Swedish region, which improved the access to provider information and reduced the switching costs of one percent of the adult population and of a sample of new residents. We examine the effects of the interventions on a large number of clinical process quality measures, access to care, and adverse health events, measured at the individual level. We find no significant effect of the interventions on any of the quality measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Anell, Anders & Dietrichson, Jens & Ellegård, Lina Maria & Kjellsson, Gustav, 2022. "Well-Informed Choices? Effects of Information Interventions in Primary Care on Care Quality," Working Papers 2022:2, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2022_002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Market frictions; Field experiment; Care quality; Primary care; Sweden;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D89 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Other
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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