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Gender and the Internet

Author

Listed:
  • Ono, Hiroshi

    () (Texas A&M University)

  • Zavodny, Madeline

    () (Agnes Scott College)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This article examines whether there are differences in men fs and women fs use of the Internet and whether any such gender gaps have changed in recent years. METHODS: We use data from several surveys during the period 1997 to 2001 to show trends in Internet usage and to estimate regression models of Internet usage that control for individuals f socioeconomic characteristics. RESULTS: Women were significantly less likely than men to use the Internet at all in the mid-1990s, but this gender gap in being online disappeared by 2000. However, once online, women remain less frequent and less intense users of the Internet. CONCLUSIONS: There is little reason for concern about sex inequalities in Internet access and usage now, but gender differences in frequency and intensity of Internet usage remain.

Suggested Citation

  • Ono, Hiroshi & Zavodny, Madeline, 2002. "Gender and the Internet," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 495, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 19 Aug 2002.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:hastef:0495
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hiroshi Ono & Madeline Zavodny, 2003. "Race, internet usage, and e-commerce," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 7-22, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fairlie Robert W., 2016. "Do Boys and Girls Use Computers Differently, and Does It Contribute to Why Boys do Worse in School Than Girls?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 59-96, January.
    2. Vergara, Sebastián & Grazzi, Matteo, 2011. "ICT access in Latin America. evidence from household level," MPRA Paper 33266, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Sabrina Bunyan & Alan Collins, 2013. "Digital Exclusion Despite Digital Accessibility: Empirical Evidence from an English City," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 104(5), pages 588-603, December.
    4. Hiroshi Ono, 2005. "Digital Inequality in East Asia: Evidence from Japan, South Korea, and Singapore," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 4(3), pages 116-139, Fall.
    5. Claudio Agostini & Manuel Willington, 2010. "Radiografía de la Brecha Digital en Chile: ¿Se Justifica la Intervención del Estado?," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv245, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
    6. Michael Demoussis & Nicholas Giannakopoulos, 2006. "Facets of the digital divide in Europe: Determination and extent of internet use," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 235-246.
    7. Hiroshi Ono & Madeline Zavodny, 2004. "Gender differences in information technology usage: a U.S.-Japan comparison," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2004-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    8. Paolo Guerrieri & Sara Bentivegna (ed.), 2011. "The Economic Impact of Digital Technologies," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14361.
    9. Cox, Joe & Collins, Alan & Drinkwater, Stephen, 2010. "Seeders, leechers and social norms: Evidence from the market for illicit digital downloading," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 299-305, December.
    10. Victor Brajer & Andrew Gill, 2010. "Yakity-Yak: Who Talks Back? An Email Experiment," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(4), pages 1007-1024.
    11. Ono, Hiroshi & Zavodny, Madeline, 2007. "Immigrants, English Ability and the Digital Divide," IZA Discussion Papers 3124, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. David E. Harrington, 2007. "Markets: Preserving Funeral Markets with Ready-to-Embalm Laws," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(4), pages 201-216, Fall.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Internet; gender; race;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • L86 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Information and Internet Services; Computer Software
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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