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Financial Repression and China’s Economic Imbalances

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Abstract

Increasing domestic and external imbalances pose a serious challenge to economic development in China. While several forms of economic imbalances have been identified and discussed, many of these imbalances represent symptoms rather than the main issues that Chinese policymakers have to deal with in order to sustain economic growth over the next decade. Building on recent research on the relationship between financial repression and economic imbalances, the main premise of this paper is that financial repression in China has been at least partly responsible for extremely high levels of investments, a very strong industrial sector and a weakly developed service sector, serious external imbalances and rising inequality. This paper discusses how the Chinese government has used repressive financial policies since the beginning of the reforms, how these policies have resulted in economic imbalances, and some initial suggestions on financial reforms that would help in the pursuit of rebalancing the Chinese economy.

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  • Johansson, Anders C., 2012. "Financial Repression and China’s Economic Imbalances," Working Paper Series 2012-22, Stockholm School of Economics, China Economic Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:hacerc:2012-022
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    Cited by:

    1. Gauvin, Ludovic & Rebillard, Cyril, 2013. "Towards Recoupling? Assessing the Impact of a Chinese Hard Landing on Commodity Exporters: Results from Conditional Forecast in a GVAR Model," MPRA Paper 65457, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Xiuping Hua & Anders C. Johansson & Xun Wang, 2017. "National and regional financial openness in China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 127-140.
    3. Marchetti, Juan & Ruta, Michele & Teh, Robert, 2012. "Trade imbalances and multilateral trade cooperation," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2012-23, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    4. Johansson, Anders C. & Wang, Xun, 2012. "Financial Sector Policies, Poverty and Inequality," Working Paper Series 2012-24, China Economic Research Center, Stockholm School of Economics.
    5. Anders C. Johansson & Xunan Feng, 2016. "The state advances, the private sector retreats? Firm effects of China’s great stimulus programme," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(6), pages 1635-1668.
    6. Johansson, Anders C. & Wang, Xun, 2014. "Financial sector policies and income inequality," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 367-378.
    7. Julian GRUIN, 2013. "Asset or Liability? The Role of the Financial System in the Political Economy of China’s Rebalancing," Journal of Current Chinese Affairs - China aktuell, Institute of Asian Studies, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Hamburg, vol. 42(4), pages 73-104.
    8. M. Albert & C. Jude & C. Rebillard, 2015. "The Long Landing Scenario: Rebalancing from Overinvestment and Excessive Credit Growth. Implications for Potential Growth in China," Working papers 572, Banque de France.
    9. Samuel Cudré, 2014. "Capital’s long march west: saving and investment frictions in Chinese regions," ECON - Working Papers 161, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    10. Veasna Kong & Adam McKissack & Dong Zhang, 2012. "China in a new period of transition," Economic Roundup, The Treasury, Australian Government, issue 4, pages 42-62, December.
    11. Andrea Fracasso, 2015. "Economic Rebalancing and Growth: the Japanese experience and China’s prospects," DEM Discussion Papers 2015/07, Department of Economics and Management.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial repression; Structural imbalances; External imbalances; Inequality; Financial liberalization; Financial reform; China;

    JEL classification:

    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • L52 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Industrial Policy; Sectoral Planning Methods
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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