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Structural Change in the Swedish economy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century – The role of import substitution and export demand

Author

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  • Bohlin, Jan

    (Department of Economic History, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

The paper presents input-output tables for the Swedish economy for 1885, 1898 and 1913. These tables are used to explore structural change and to decompose Swedish economic growth in 1885–1898 and 1898–1913 into different demand sources: exports, import substitution and home market growth. While the 1890’s was a decade of import substitution export demand was always important and a much more important source of demand growth than import substitution after the turn of the century 1900

Suggested Citation

  • Bohlin, Jan, 2007. "Structural Change in the Swedish economy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century – The role of import substitution and export demand," Göteborg Papers in Economic History 8, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunhis:0008
    as

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/3105
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark Thomas, 1983. "Rearmament and Economic Recovery in the late 1930S," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 36(4), pages 552-579, November.
    2. Sara Horrell & Jane Humphries & Martin Weale, 1994. "An input-output table for 1841," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 47(3), pages 545-566, August.
    3. Bohlin, Jan, 2003. "Swedish historical national accounts: The fifth generation," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(1), pages 73-97, April.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Liu, Dan & Meissner, Christopher M., 2015. "Market potential and the rise of US productivity leadership," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 72-87.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic History; Input-output tables; Inter-industry economics; Structural change;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis
    • N13 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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