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Xenophobia and distribution in France : A politico-economic analysis

  • John Roemer

    (Yale University [New Haven])

  • Karine Van Der Straeten

    (PSE - La plante et son environnement - CNRS - Institut national de la recherche agronomique (INRA) - UP11 - Université Paris-Sud - Paris 11 - Institut National Agronomique Paris-Grignon)

We study the effect of anti-immigrant sentiments among voters on the equilibrium position of political parties on the economic issue. We model political competition as taking place among three parties (Left, Right, and Extreme Right) on a two-dimensional policy space (economic issue, immigration issue) using an extension of the Party Unanimity Nash Equilibrium concept. We "calibrate" the model to French survey data for the election years 1988 and 2002, and show that the immigration issue influences equilibrium on the economic issue in a significant way.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Working Papers with number hal-00242934.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-00242934
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  1. Alberto Alesina & Edward Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote, 2001. "Why Doesn't The US Have a European-Style Welfare State?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1933, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Woojin Lee & John E. Roemer, 2004. "Racism and Redistribution in the United States: A Solution to the Problem of American Exceptionalism," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1462, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  3. Jack High (ed.), 2001. "Competition," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1751, April.
  4. Assar Lindbeck & Jörgen Weibull, 1987. "Balanced-budget redistribution as the outcome of political competition," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 273-297, January.
  5. David Austen-Smith & Michael Wallerstein, 2003. "Redistribution in a Divided Society," Discussion Papers 1362, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
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