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Risk aversion and framing effects

Author

Listed:
  • Louis Lévy-Garboua

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics, CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CIRANO - Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en analyse des organisations - UQAM - Université du Québec à Montréal)

  • Hela Maafi

    (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • David Masclet

    (CIRANO - Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en analyse des organisations - UQAM - Université du Québec à Montréal , CREM - Centre de recherche en économie et management - UNICAEN - Université de Caen Normandie - NU - Normandie Université - UR1 - Université de Rennes 1 - UNIV-RENNES - Université de Rennes - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Antoine Terracol

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics)

Abstract

We present a new experimental evidence of how framing affects decisions in the context of a lottery choice experiment for measuring risk aversion. We investigate framing effects by replicating the Holt and Laury's (Am. Econ. Rev. 92:1644-1655, 2002) procedure for measuring risk aversion under various frames. We first examine treatments where participants are confronted with the 10 decisions to be made either simultaneously or sequentially. The second treatment variable is the order of appearance of the ten lottery pairs. Probabilities of winning are ranked either in increasing, decreasing, or in random order. Lastly, payoffs were increased by a factor of ten in additional treatments. The rate of inconsistencies was significantly higher in sequential than in simultaneous treatment, in increasing and random than in decreasing treatment. Both experience and salient incentives induce a dramatic decrease in inconsistent behaviors. On the other hand, risk aversion was significantly higher in sequential than in simultaneous treatment, in decreasing and random than in increasing treatment, in high than in low payoff condition. These findings suggest that subjects use available information which has no value for normative theories, like throwing a glance at the whole connected set of pairwise choices before making each decision in a connected set of lottery pairs.

Suggested Citation

  • Louis Lévy-Garboua & Hela Maafi & David Masclet & Antoine Terracol, 2012. "Risk aversion and framing effects," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" hal-00617673, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:pseose:hal-00617673
    DOI: 10.1007/s10683-011-9293-5
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00617673
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Noémi Berlin & Jean-Louis Tavani & Maud Beasançon, 2016. "An exploratory study of creativity, personality and schooling achievement," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(5), pages 536-556, September.
    2. Giuseppe Attanasi & Nikolaos Georgantzís & Valentina Rotondi & Daria Vigani, 2018. "Lottery- and survey-based risk attitudes linked through a multichoice elicitation task," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 84(3), pages 341-372, May.
    3. Géraldine Bocquého & Marc Deschamps & Jenny Helstroffer & Julien Jacob & Majlinda Joxhe, 2018. "The risk and refugee migration," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2018-10, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. Antonio Filippin & Paolo Crosetto, 2016. "A Reconsideration of Gender Differences in Risk Attitudes," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 62(11), pages 3138-3160, November.
    5. Bauermeister, Golo-Friedrich & Mußhoff, Oliver, 2017. "Multiple switching behavior in different display formats of multiple price lists," DARE Discussion Papers 1706, Georg-August University of Göttingen, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development (DARE).
    6. Antoni Bosch-Domènech & Joaquim Silvestre, 2013. "Measuring risk aversion with lists: a new bias," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 75(4), pages 465-496, October.
    7. Bauermeister, Golo-Friedrich & Mußhoff, Oliver, 2016. "Risk Attitude And Inconsistencies - Does The Choice Of Display Format And Risk Elicitation Method Influence The Outcomes?," 56th Annual Conference, Bonn, Germany, September 28-30, 2016 244764, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    8. M. Pelé & M. Broihanne & B. Thierry & J. Call & V. Dufour, 2014. "To bet or not to bet? Decision-making under risk in non-human primates," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 141-166, October.
    9. Bauermeister, Golo & Musshoff, Oliver, 2016. "Risk Aversion and Inconsistencies - Does the Choice of Risk Elicitation Method and Display Format Influence the Outcomes?," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235348, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. repec:kap:expeco:v:20:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10683-017-9513-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Sauter, Philipp & Hermann, Daniel & Mußhoff, Oliver, 2015. "Risk attitudes of foresters, farmers and students: An experimental multimethod comparison," DARE Discussion Papers 1514, Georg-August University of Göttingen, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development (DARE).
    12. repec:spr:jesaex:v:3:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s40881-016-0032-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Chie Hanaoka & Hitoshi Shigeoka & Yasutora Watanabe, 2015. "Do Risk Preferences Change? Evidence from Panel Data before and after the Great East Japan Earthquake," NBER Working Papers 21400, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Anne Corcos & François Pannequin & Claude Montmarquette,, 2017. "Measuring individual risk-attitudes: an experimental comparison between Holt & Laury measure and an insurance-choices-based procedure," Working Papers 2017-79, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    15. Friedman, Daniel & Habib, Sameh & James, Duncan & Crockett, Sean, 2018. "Varieties of risk elicitation," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship Market Design: Theory and Pragmatics SP II 2018-501, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    16. Alserda, G.A.G., 2017. "Measuring Normative Risk Preferences," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2017-003-F&A, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    17. repec:eee:soceco:v:73:y:2018:i:c:p:22-33 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Aurélie Dariel, 2013. "Cooperation preferences and framing effects," Diskussionsschriften dp1302, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Risk aversion; Lottery choice experiment; Framing effects; Experience effects; Incentive effects;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General
    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General

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